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establishment of a genetic transformation platform for cassava in the eca

Project Code:  P033-08-P4-01-001

Goal           
Enhanced productivity, value-added and competitiveness of cassava in the Eastern and central African region

Purpose     
Enhanced utilization of cassava transformation technologies to provide improved cassava in the ECA

Project Background/Rationale 
Over 30 million tons of cassava is produced annually in the ASARECA region, which is more than any other staple food crop grown in the region, including banana and maize. Cassava’s ability to produce food under marginal conditions has made it a popular crop among poor farmers for purposes of food security. On average, between 1961 and 1999, the value of cassava production (over $2 billion annually) was the highest among all crops produced in the ASARECA region (IFPRI, 2001). 

Diseases and pests are responsible for the dramatic reduction of cassava harvests, cutting yields to less than half their potential.  For example, while cassava yields are only 9 tons per hectare in ASARECA region, in India, the yields are averaged at 25 tons per hectare.  Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) and cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) are currently the most important constraints affecting cassava production in the ASARECA countries.  The geminiviruses African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and the “Ugandan variant” of East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-UG) are the original viruses causing CMD. The current pandemic of CMD devastating cassava production in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, and other countries is however associated with the more virulent EACMV-UG. On the other hand, the causal virus of CBSD is a potyvirus Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV). All these viruses are transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

Researchers at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (DDPSC) in the United States have used genetic engineering to introduce genes that confer resistance to CMD into cassava. This is a potential solution to the CMD problem.  Several lines of transgenic cassava produced at DDPSC have undergone testing in greenhouses and demonstrated high levels of resistance to CMD.  These lines will soon be ready for testing the efficacy of the genes in the field in the ASARECA region. The Kenya Agricultural Research Organisation (KARI), the National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO) and Mikocheni Agricultural Research Organisation (MARI) have established collaborative linkages with the DDPSC and have all participated in the process of developing the transgenic cassava lines in the US. The long term aim is to improve farmer preferred but highly susceptible local cassava cultivars by introducing CMD resistance genes while retaining the superior storage root traits. To speed this process, much of the initial laboratory and plant transformation work has been conducted by the Kenyan and Ugandan scientists working alongside an international team of scientists at the DDPSC.

This proposal seeks to build upon the knowledge gained so far through the creation of institutional capacity in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania to genetically modify cassava. This will empower the cassava research team at in the ASARECA region I to play an expanded role in the sustainable production of cassava targeting a wider array of agronomic and nutritional traits, with great potential for spill over effects in the entire ECA sub-region.

Project Funding Type: Direct Award

Participating countries:  Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.

Participating Institutions and Country Location:
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kenya; Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI), Tanzania; and National Crop Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI), Uganda

Lead Institution: National Crop Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI), Uganda
 
Project Duration:  4 Years

Starting Date:  2008

Ending Date:    2011

Source of Funding:        MDTF (ii) USAID

Amount of Funding:        309,229 USD

 Available funds:                              309,229 USD      

Shortfall:                                          0 USD

applying tissue culture to improve access to cassava and sweet potato clean planting materials for farmers in eastern and central africa.

Project code

P034-08-P4-02-002

Old Project code

 

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of cassava and sweetpotato in the eastern and central African region.

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of cassava transformation technologies to provide improved cassava in the ECA

Background/Rationale

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) are major staple crops for millions of people in East and Central Africa (ECA), mostly in the rural areas. Cassava is the second most important staple crop in Africa after maize while sweetpotato considered as 'small' farmer's crop, providing a stable food source, particularly for low income, resource-poor farmers. It is also used as a high-energy source of feed for livestock. In the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Program (CAADP), cassava and sweetpotato are ranked among the high priority crops for agricultural research to contribute to food security and poverty alleviation for the urban and rural poor.
Despite the clear livelihood, economic importance and the genetic potential the two crops face several challenges. Productivity of cassava and sweetpotato in the ECA sub region is hampered by the inadequate good quality planting materials for farmers. Other challenges including pest and diseases, unavailability of suitable varieties, inefficient multiplication and distribution systems, poor market access and the lack of conducive policy and regulatory environment. This project intends to generate appropriate cassava and sweetpotato tissue culture technologies and make them available to ease multiplication of planting materials; strengthen capacity for cassava and sweetpotato tissue culture in the NARS and make available to stakeholders information on the cassava and sweetpotato tissue culture in general.

 

Project Funding Type

Direct Award

Participating Countries

Burundi, Congo DR., Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda.

Participating  institutions and country locations

National Crop Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI), Uganda; Makerere University, Uganda, Biosciences eastern and central Africa (BecA), Kenya; Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), Colombia; Africa Harvest Biotech Foundation Int'l (AHBFI), Kenya; Tissue Culture Business Network (TCBN) of Agro-Genetic Technologies Ltd (AGT), Uganda; Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI), Tanzania; International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA, Kenya

Lead Institution

National Crop Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI), Uganda

Project Duration

5 Years

Starting Date

2008

Ending Date

2011

Source of funding

(i) USAID (ii) MDTF

Amount of funding

366,061 USD

conservation for sustainable availability of cassava and sweet potato germplasm through biotechnology applications

Project code

P035-08-P4-03-003

Old Project Code

 

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of cassava and sweetpotato in the eastern and central African region.

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of conservation technologies for the conservation of cassava and sweetpotato germplasm in the ECA sub-region.

Background/Rationale

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) are major staple crops for millions of people in East and Central Africa (ECA). These crops are ranked priority staple crops in Africa by the African Union. They have been ranked among the high priority crops for agricultural research to contribute to food security and poverty alleviation for the urban and rural poor in the CAADP.

Among constraints limiting productivity of the two crops is lack of an efficient and effective mechanism for germplasm conservation which has often led to genetic erosion. Biotechnology as a tool to enhance utilization and conservation of genetic resources will be used for cassava and sweet potato germplasm exploration, characterization and ultimately their conservation and utilization. This project  will assist in assemblage of   cultivated and landrace cassava and sweetpotato germplasm in the ECA countries, characterize and document collected germplasm, refurbish and equip a central gene-bank that will offer service to the rest of the region, establish a database system for cassava and sweetpotato germplasm, train technicians and scientists in cassava and sweetpotato conservation specialized skills and create awareness on benefits of cassava and sweetpotato germplasm conservation


Project Funding Type

Direct Award

Participating Countries

Burundi, D.R Congo., Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and    Uganda, Sudan.

Participating  institutions and country locations

National Genebank of Kenya (NGK); Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI); National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO), Uganda; Institut National des Recherches Agronomiques (INERA), DR Congo ; Ethiopian Institute for Agricultural Research (EIAR); Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Burundi(ISABU), Burundi; Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Rwanda (ISAR), Rwanda ; Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI), Tanzania, Biosciences eastern and central Africa (BecA) (ILRI), Kenya, Agricultural research Corporation, Sudan.

Lead Institution

Kenya agricultural Research Institute and National Crop Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI), Uganda

Project Duration

4 years

Starting Date

2008

Ending Date

2011

Source of funding

USAID

Amount of funding

515,570 USD

genetic engineering of maize for drought tolerance in eastern and central africa

Project code

P036-08-P4-04-004

Old Project Code

 

Goal

To develop and avail drought tolerant engineered maize genotypes adapted to ECA

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of genetic engineering technologies to provide drought tolerant maize germplasm to maize breeding Programmes in the ECA sub-region.

Background/Rationale
In ECA there is consensus that maize is the most favorite staple food crop growing on more than 5.5milion hectares, mostly by small and medium scale farmers providing well over 50% dietary calories with a per capita consumption of about 100kg/year. In this regard, maize has a similar position in terms of dietary importance as rice in Asia.  However, Maize yield in Africa is far below that in industrialized countries, which is 8 tons per hectare, compared to that in Africa, which average 1.2 ton per hectare. Drought has been identified as a major stress affecting productivity of maize in Africa leading to up to 70% crop loss and in certain cases total crop loss.
Conventional breeding aimed at breeding varieties resistant to drought have not yielded any success so far.  Prospects for using biotechnology as a tool to introgress drought resistance genes into well adapted varieties have been proven to work elsewhere.  This project aims at introgressing drought resistance genes through genetic transformation into local varieties from Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia that are already popular with the farmers.

 

Project Funding Type

Direct Award

Participating Countries

Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Sudan.

Participating  institutions and country locations

Kenyatta University, Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology, Kenya; Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI), Tanzania; Ethopia Institute of Agriculture Research (EIAR), Ethiopia; Sudan Agricultural Research Co-operation (ARC), Sudan

Lead Institution

Kenyatta University

Project Duration

4 years

Starting Date

2008

Ending Date

2011

Source of funding

USAID

Amount of funding

350,980 USD

integrating agro-diversity with conservation to improve livelihood in savannah ecosystem

Project code

P038-09-P4-02-006

Old Project Code

AB/2009/02

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the Savannah Ecosystem in the eastern and central African region.

Purpose

Enhanced utilisation of best-bet land use practices in the Serengeti-Mara region

Background/Rationale

Agro-ecosystems and biological resources play an important role to human livelihoods through their role in the delivery of a number of key goods and services (food, feed, fiber, water, biodiversity, and carbon storage) valued by society. Natural biodiversity has provided the foundation for all agricultural plants and animals. The entire range of the domestic crops used in world agriculture is derived from wild species that have been modified through domestication, selective breeding and hybridization. Most remaining agroecoystems contain populations of variable and adaptable landraces as well as wild and weedy relatives of crops, all of which provide valuable adapted genetic resources for crop improvement. In addition to producing valuable plants and animals, biodiversity performs many ecological services. In natural ecosystems, the vegetative cover of a forest or grassland prevents soil erosion, replenishes ground water and controls flooding by enhancing infiltration and reducing water runoff.

These agro-ecosystems and biological resources in ECA region are suffering from continued and accelerated degradation. This is characterized by the loss of important wetlands, soil fertility, forest cover, grasslands, agro-biodiversity and genetic pools of animal, plant and microbial species. Natural resources and ecosystems are continually degraded because there is a general perception that turning crops directly into income generates higher benefits than conservation. When these natural services are lost due to degradation, the economic and environmental costs are significant. Overall, there is creation of an artificial ecosystem that requires constant human intervention. To address this global challenge, previous conservation efforts had limited success due to complex technical, policy, social, institutional and enterprise issues in managing natural resources for socio-economic benefits and environmental services. This current project aims at developing methodologies for agrobiodiversity conservation for improved livelihoods from a point of improved productivity while integrating all the complex issues that affected the previous results.

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream A

Participating Countries

Kenya, Tanzania.

Participating  institutions and country locations

University of Dar-es-salaam, Tanzania; Kenyatta University, Kenya ; Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya; National Museums of Kenya; National Environment Management Authority (NEMA), Kenya; Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Lead Institution

National Museums of Kenya

Project Duration

18 months

Starting Date

   2009

Ending Date

2010

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

510,891USD

evaluation of striga resistant farmer preferred sorghum varieties in the eca

Project Code: 

 

Goal           

Enhanced productivity, value-added and competitiveness of sorghum in the Eastern and central African region

 

Purpose  Enhanced utilization of Striga resistance technologies to increase sorghum productivity in eastern and central Africa

 

Project Background/Rationale 

Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is the fifth most important cereal crop worldwide FAOSTAT data, 2004), and together with maize and pearl millet, form the most important dryland cereal crop for the semi-arid tropics. The parasitic weeds, Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth. and S. asiatica (L.) Kuntze, are major biotic constraints to sorghum production, especially in more marginal areas where continuous cropping as a result of population pressure, has led to widespread soil infertility.  Although research on Striga in Africa has a long history, efforts to promote Striga management have had limited success among smallholder farmers.  A number of Striga control measures have been suggested but most of these methods developed through conventional approaches have been of limited value to subsistence farmers. The development and utilization of Striga-resistant crop varieties holds the best promise of combating and reducing the effect of this noxious weed on sorghum yields. Striga management strategies need to meet the twin objectives of immediate yield increase while reducing the level of the parasite's seed in the soil. There is inadequate knowledge of genetic variability of parasite populations, particularly for S. hermonthica and S.asiatica which devastates sorghum in East Africa. This knowledge is critical for future development of durable resistance. The number of farmer preferred Striga resistant sorghum cultivars is limited and it is imperative that the technologies that are currently available be evaluated and disseminated in order to combat this menace. The project is building on the successes of the previous ASARECA project by systematically evaluating the available Striga resistant lines and promoting the dissemination of these technologies for integration in various farming systems of the semi-arid areas of ECA.

 

 

Project Funding Type: Direct Award

 

Participating countries:  Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location:

African Biodiversity Conservation and Innovations Centre (ABCIC), Kenya; Agricultural Research Council (ARC), Sudan; University of Nairobi, Kenya; Makerere University; Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Rwanda (ISAR), Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI), Tanzania; NARO/National Semi-Arid Resources Research Institute, Uganda.

Lead Institution: African Biodiversity Conservation and Innovations Centre (ABCIC)

 

Project Duration:  1 Year

 

Starting Date:  2011

 

Ending Date:    2011

 

Source of Funding:        USAID

 

Amount of Funding:      210,059 USD

improving food security and livelihoods in eastern africa through improved community based low cost tissue culture innovations

Project Code:  -

 

Goal           

Enhanced productivity, value-added and competitiveness of Banana Potato, Cassava and Sweetpotato in the Eastern and central African region

 

Purpose  

To enhance utilization of high quality tissue culture planting material of banana, potato, cassava and Sweetpotato in ECA

 

Project Background/Rationale 

Using tissue culture (TC), it is possible to produce disease-free planting materials for the farmers.  The tissue culture technology has made it possible for farmers to access large quantities of superior disease free plantlets of various crops. Despite the benefits of tissue culture techniques for multiplication of elite clones, elimination of pathogens in planting material and rapid deployment of superior genotypes, various challenges limit the achievement of the full benefits of the technology. The high cost of the TC plantlets is one of the factors limiting the adoption of tissue culture crops by small scale farmers in ECA region. In Kenya, Uganda and Burundi for example, the calculated price per tissue-cultured banana plantlet is US$1.50, which is four times the estimated price of low-cost tissue culture plantlets from countries such as Taiwan or Thailand.

Tissue culture also suffers major operational challenges currently facing public and private TC laboratories. All the tissue culture labs in the ECA region are located mainly in the cities and transportation to the end-users' in the rural areas adds to the cost of the product. Although tissue culture hardening nurseries have been established at the farm level this has not contributed to cost reduction since the management cost of nurseries is high and when added to the initial cost of plantlets the final cost is still too high for the resource-poor farmer. The project will attempt to address these problems by supporting establishment of low cost community based tissue culture innovation platforms and mobilize private sector/farming communities to operate their own low cost tissue culture facilities to micropropagate clean planting materials for their use. The project will research on optimizing physical components of the TC technology such as; low cost lay-out of the laboratories; low cost media and culture containers; reducing electricity, lighting; and increasing labour efficiency. Overall, the plan is to strengthen the seed value-chain of cassava, potatoes, banana and sweet potatoes through building sustainability chains from TC laboratories to distribution networks of plantlets to markets. The project is building on the successes of the previous ASARECA project by impacting the rural community by providing employment thus increasing income opportunities to farming communities and vulnerable groups especially women and youth.

 

Project Funding Type: Direct Award

 

Participating countries:  Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Madagascar, DR Congo, Rwanda and Burundi

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location:

MARI-Tanzania, ISAR-Rwanda, EIAR- Ethiopia, INERA-DR Congo, ARC-Sudan, NARI-Eritrea and FIFOMONOR-Madagascar), MAK, Uganda; MUCST, Kenya, AGROBIOTECH-Burundi; AGT-Uganda, NARI, Eritrea

 

Lead Institution: MARI-Tanzania,

 

Project Duration:  3 Years

 

Starting Date:  2011

 

Ending Date:    2013

 

Source of Funding:       MDTF/USAID

 

Amount of Funding:      1,000,000 USD

building sustainable rural livelihoods through integrated agro-biodiversity conservation in eca savannah ecosystem

Project Code: 


Goal           

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the sub-regional agricultural system


Purpose  

Enhanced utilization of agro-biodiversity and development of best bet practices/ innovations in the ECA savannah ecosystems.

 


Project Background/Rationale 

Despite the continued local and global efforts to enhance agricultural productivity and the increased momentum towards globalization and poverty reduction, resource degradation continues to increase in most rural areas including within the Eastern and Central African (ECA) sub-region. The widespread destruction of the natural environment has a crucial livelihood impact on the majority of the especially rural poor in this region, as they depend directly for their livelihood on natural resources (mostly through agriculture, forestry, soil, water, livestock, wildlife and fisheries and other biodiversity), and on ecosystems that provide valuable services (clean water and air, flood prevention, pollination, food, nutrient cycling, seed dispersal, pest and disease control and recreational benefits).  It is urgent that this trend be reversed by encouraging farmers to adopt a variety of sustainable agricultural methods that will have long-term benefits in environmental conservation and sustainable livelihoods. The issue here is how to address livelihood issues in the ECA region, by practicing sustainable alternative livelihoods means compatible with subsistence agricultural production systems without compromising environmental tranquility.

Local small holder farmers in the savannah ecosystems within ECA countries need to be offered a variety of these most feasible technologies from which they can choose and adapt and adopt a combination to their individual circumstances. This integrated system is needed as a winning combination that enhances biodiversity conservation in multiple ways such as by increasing crop yields, enhancing soil biological activity, promoting nutrient recycling, intensifying land use, improving profits, and therefore, helping to reduce poverty and malnutrition while strengthening environmental sustainability and wellbeing of the local community.

 

The project is building on the successes of the previous ASARECA project which identified at  least 10 (ten) best "best-bet" management practices/technologies in the four study sites in Kenya and Tanzania for which there is sufficient evidence of widespread applicability and which are promising and appropriate in a variety of circumstances, or, with more farm testing, that need to be promoted are: 1) Bee Keeping, 2) Mushroom farming, 3) Biogas, 4) Woodlots, 5) Organic farming, 6) Community Conservancies, 7) Improved livestock husbandry, 8) Community ecolodges, 9) Bird watching, and 10) Poultry farming among others. The study will come up with a combination of these technologies likely to have the greatest impact to livelihoods impacting the rural community by providing employment thus increasing income opportunities to farming communities and vulnerable groups especially women and youth.

 

Project Funding Type: Direct Award

 

Participating countries:  Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location:

National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi Kenya;University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania;Serengeti National Parks, Arusha, Tanzania; Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, Kenya; Kenyatta University, Kenya; National Environmental Management Authority, Nairobi, Kenya; National Forestry Research Institute, Uganda; Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Uganda Wildlife Authority, Kampala, Uganda; National Environmental Management Authority, Uganda.

 

Lead Institution: National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi Kenya.

 

Project Duration:  3 Years

 

Starting Date:  2011

 

Ending Date:    2013

 

Source of Funding:       MDTF

 

Amount of Funding:      265, 259 USD

enhancing sorghum adaptability to climate change- striga resistance and drought tolerance traits pyramiding through biotechnological approaches

Project Code: 

 

Goal           

Enhanced productivity, value-added and competitiveness of sorghum in the Eastern and central African region

 

Purpose  

Enhanced utilization of genetic engineering and marker assisted technologies in Sorghum breeding in the ECA sub-region

 

Project Background/Rationale 

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is the fifth most important cereal crop globally after wheat, maize, rice and barley. In the Eastern Africa region an average of approximately 7 million ha yr-1 has been harvested, and 5.4 million tons of sorghum grain produced over the past three years (FAO, 2001). Sorghum grain yields in the Eastern Africa region are however, low and highly variable from year to year.  Striga and drought are the major constraints affecting sorghum and other cereal crops production in Sub Sahara Africa (SSA).

 

Traditionally, many Striga control methods were tried; i) cultural measures, including crop rotaton, intercropping, trap-cropping and catch cropping.  ii) Chemical measures including; fertilizers, herbicides, and soil sanitation; iii) bio-control measures including; insects and  Fusarium pathogens, However, crop losses and the Striga host range has continued to increase in spite of the use of widely advocated control methods. Recently, it is suggested that no sole method is effective to control the parasite and striga management reside on integrated approach for which resistant crop cultivars are the backbone. A sustainable method to overcome this biological pest in Africa would be to develop crop germplasm resistant to parasites. This is achievable through development of resistant crop cultivars using molecular-biological tools; marker assisted selection and transformation. 

 

Significant progress has been made in identifying molecular markers for Striga resistance in sorghum under field conditions by ICRISAT and ASARECA. Genomic regions (quantitative trait loci, QTL) associated with stable Striga resistance from resistant line N13 have been identified across a range of 10 field trials in Mali and Kenya. Fore-ground and background selection of these QTL are underway in several NARS of ECA and ICRISAT laboratories managed by ASARECA to introgress the Striga resistance QTLs into farmer preferred sorghum varieties. Similarly, Stay-green (SG), a drought tolerance trait of sorghum, has been mapped in several sorghum varieties including B35, E36-1 and SC56 and is regularly targeted in many breeding programs

 

Fifteen wild sorghum accessions identified and their field Striga resistant and drought tolerance traits are confirmed. The project aims at  identifying markers linked to QTLs associated with Striga resistance as well as tagging the genes involved in the wild relatives of sorghum to strengthen cultivated sorghum Striga resistance. The project will also combine this, marker assisted breeding approach with and genetic engineering to boost Striga resistant and drought tolerant  in cultivated sorghum.

 

Project Funding Type: Direct Award

 

Participating countries:  Kenya, Tanzania,  Sudan, Eritrea

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location:

Kenyatta University- Kenya; Sorghum Breeding and Genetics Program; ARC, Sudan, Khartoum; University of Nairobi- Kenya; NARI, Asmara, Eritrea

 

Lead Institution: Kenyatta University;

 

Project Duration:  3 Years

 

Starting Date:  2011

 

Ending Date:    2013

 

Source of Funding:       MDTF

 

Amount of Funding:     536,480 USD

rationalization and harmonization of policies, laws, regulations and procedures for key agricultural sectors in eca

Project code

P047-08-P6-01-001

Old Project Code

014

Goal

Enhanced competitiveness of trade and value addition in the region            

Purpose

Policy options for sustainable agricultural growth harmonized and outcomes assessed in ECA

Background/Rationale
Rationalizing aims at changing the way business is done to increase efficiency and/or reduce waste. It focuses on how a country conducts business in a given subsector, and determines what should be done to make business more efficient. Harmonizing brings together regionally different approaches (policies, laws, regulations and procedures) into a unified strategy. This process allows commodities and factors to move freely across national boundaries, and in the process improves domestic and foreign investment by expanding markets beyond national borders. Since 1999, ASARECA through its policy organs has contributed towards attainment of a seamless border for trade in seed, dairy and root crops.
This project brings together four modules that are working towards rationalization and harmonization of policies, laws and regulations in the informal dairy sector, seeds, root crops sector, and biotechnology and biosafety in the ECA region. The activities under each module have four common output areas: development and pilot testing of appropriate policy implementation instruments; facilitation of advocacy for appropriate policy implementation; analysis and documentation of policy changes and implementation processes in ECA, and assessments of outcomes and impacts of policy changes.
The major output of this project will be well developed and harmonised agricultural commodity and input policies, guidelines, procedures and regulations in the region. The outcomes include:

  • Enhanced capacity in the region to assess and manage risk attributed to transboundary movement of seeds, genetically modified organisms etc and their use and inform policy decisions on safety aspects and biotechnology use
  • Removal of regulatory bottlenecks to transboundary movement of inputs and outputs in the region
  • Well developed regional policy and advocacy strategy that defines the most effective mechanisms for disseminating information, fostering coordination and influencing policy implementation processes. 
  • Enhanced competitiveness of trade and value addition in the region as a result of harmonized quality standards and specifications to guide branding and certification processes

Project Funding Type

Direct

Participating Countries

All ASARECA countries

Participating  institutions and country locations

Module I: Informal Dairy
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI),Kenya
Provincial Agriculture and Livestock Department (DPAE), Burundi
Kenya Dairy Board (KDB), Kenya
Rwanda Animal Resources Development Authority (RARDA), Rwanda
Tanzania Dairy Board (TDB), Tanzania
Austro Project (NGO), Tanzania
East African Community (EAC),Tanzania
Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA),Tanzania
Dairy Development Authority (DDA),Uganda
Makerere University, Uganda
Module II: Seed
Africa Seed Trade Association (AFSTA), Kenya
Eastern Africa Seed Committee (EASCOM), Kenya
Burundi Seed Trade Association, Burundi
Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Burundi (ISABU), Burundi
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INERA), DR Congo
National Agricultural Research Institute (NARI), Eritrea
Ethiopia Seed Trade Association (ESTA), Ethiopia
Seed Trade Association Kenya (STAK), Kenya
Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Service (KEPHIS), Kenya
Malagasy Seed Trade Association (AMPROSEM), Madagascar
Rwanda Seed Trade Association (STAR), Rwanda
Sudan Seed Trade Association (SSTA), Sudan
Tanzania Seed Trade Association (TASTA), Tanzania
Tanzania Official Seed Certification Institute (TOSCI), Tanzania
Ministry of Agriculture Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF), Uganda
Uganda Seed Trade Association (USTA)
Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA)
Zambia
Module III: Root crops
Buginyanya Zonal Agricultural Research Development Institute (BUGIZARDI), Uganda
Quality and Standards Authority of Ethiopia (QSAE), Ethiopia
Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)
Ministry of Agriculture, Ethiopia
Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS)
Jomo Kenya University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT)
Ministry of Agriculture, Kenya
University of Antananarivo, UPDR-MPAE and FOFIFA, Madagascar
Malagasy Bureau of Standards (BNM)
Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF), Uganda
Uganda National Bureau of Standards (UNBS)
East African Community (EAC), Tanzania
Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), Zambia
Module IV: RABESA II
International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) Kenya
Programme for Biosafety Systems (PBS), Kenya, Netherlands, Uganda
International Food Policy Research Institute, USA
Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), Zambia
East African Community (EAC), Tanzania

Lead Institution

Module I
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya
Module  II
Africa Seed Trade Association (AFSTA) with the Eastern Africa Seed Committee, Kenya
Module  III
Buginyanya Zonal Agricultural Research Development Institute (BUGIZARDI) - NARO, Uganda
Module  IV
International Service for the Acquisition of Agric-biotech Applications (ISAAA), Kenya

Project Duration

5 years

Starting Date

2008

Ending Date

2012

Source of funding

USAID-EA

Amount of funding

US$ 2,064,980

Available

US$ 2,064,980

Shortfall

0

strategies for adapting to climate change in rural sub-saharan africa: targeting the most vulnerable

Project code

P048-08-P6-02-002

 

Old Project Code

 

062

 

Goal

 

Reduced vulnerability of rural households to climate change through better-coordinated and targeted food system adaptation strategies.

 

Purpose

 

To provide regional organizations, policymakers and farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa with tools to identify and implement appropriate adaptation strategies.

 

 

Background/Rationale

  •         This project is based on the premise that climate change will have a significant impact on the livelihoods and living conditions of the poor in developing countries. Long-term changes in climate will disproportionately affect regions in both the semi-arid and arid parts of the globe and the more humid tropics. Within these areas, the effects of climate change vary across regions, farming and food systems, households, and individuals. Moreover, other simultaneous global changes, including changing trade patterns and energy policies, have the potential to exacerbate the negative effects of climate change on some systems and groups.
  •           Thus, analyses of biophysical and socio-economic factors determining exposure and adaptive capacity and adaptation to climate change are urgently needed to make more effective and informed policy decisions. Given limited resources, adaptation strategies must be targeted to those populations and households that are most vulnerable to global change, and must also equip those unable to adapt- generally the poorest-with tools and incentives that will allow them to undertake adaptation. In order to facilitate a coordinated and effective policy response to this complex set of challenges, this project will identify where exposure is strongest and adaptive capacity weakest, and will develop a robust framework to support policy decisions by food (livestock/crop) production system, which indicates regions and groups to be targeted as well as the appropriate adaptation strategies for target groups/regions based on the matrix of household-level impacts and responses. Investment requirements will be developed for alternative adaptation strategies.  To ensure adoption, in addition to the production system analysis, a micro-level analysis of farm households will help identify both constraints to adaptation and means to undertake adaptation.

 

Expected outputs are:

 

  •         Set of alternative global change scenarios, based on projected changes in climate, land use, socio-economic factors, and alternative policies.
  •      Typology of production systems that integrates biophysical and socio-economic factors, including intensity of production, land use, cropping/livestock systems, and a range of food security indicators.
  •    Household-level impact and response matrix by production system under alternative global change scenarios.
  •       Micro-level adaptation analysis to support regional/meso-level analysis (selected ASARECA and the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) member countries)
  •        Robust framework to support policy decisions, which indicates regions and groups to be targeted as well as the appropriate adaptation strategies for target groups/regions based on the matrix of household-level impacts and responses, and associated investment requirements.
  •   Synthesis reports and manuals for policymakers, outreach, and capacity development

 

 

 

Project Funding Type

 

Direct

 

Participating Countries

 

All ASARECA member countries

 

Participating  institutions and country locations

 

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI),Washington, DC

ASARECA, Uganda

Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), South Africa

Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK),Germany

Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Germany

 

Lead Institution

 

International Food Policy Research Institution (IFPRI)

 

Project Duration

 

3 Years

 

Starting Date

 

2009

 

Ending Date

 

30th April 2011

 

Source of funding

 

BMZ through IFPRI

 

Amount of funding

 

US$ 191,241

 

Available

 

US$ 191,241

 

Shortfall

 

0

natural resource management and biodiversity conservation in the dry lands of eca

Project code

P050-09-P6-02-004

Old Project Code

    PAAP/09/02   ( 027)

Goal

Make a significant contribution to understanding social and environmental problems and high priority national and regional policy issues and potential reforms that will favor improved and sustainable biodiversity conservation and enhance livelihoods in pastoral areas of eastern and central African region.

Purpose

To Generate knowledge and change in perception and attitude on drivers of change to enable investment and opportunities in eastern African dry lands.

Background/Rationale
This project examines the assertion that dry land biodiversity may be best conserved by supporting the livelihoods of the pastoralists who manage this diversity. Socio economic indicators, such as food aid dependency and the increasing proportion of people no longer active in pastoralism, suggest that pastoral economies are under pressure of various internal and external drivers such as for example climate change and human population growth. When left unaddressed, these pressures will lead to poverty or alternative land uses, with adverse effects on biodiversity and pastoral livelihoods such as privatization of lands and encroachment of agriculture, processes leading to exclusion and marginalization of the remaining pastoralists.
There is a strong economic rationale for protecting biodiversity and pastoral livelihoods. However, the prevailing policy environment favours other land uses in the dry lands that are environmentally less sustainable and economically less viable. To address this imbalance it is necessary to identify sustainable investment options that re-enable pastoralists to invest in both livestock keeping and biodiversity conservation. This research project will compare the divergent impacts of policies in different countries and contexts and will help in identifying policy options and likely outcomes of different policy directions. The project will explore options for policy harmonization that support biodiversity conservation and sustainable use in pastoral lands, and will assess the relevance of policy harmonization for the different sectors examined. The expected outcomes of the project will entail removal of policy disincentives derived from the existing misconceptions of pastoralism as an undesirable way of life, appropriate social service delivery, good governance, rights to resources, investment and infrastructure; such support can be regulatory, market-based (e.g., carbon trading), or involving a complementary balance of customary and state governance at the national and regional level.
The key outputs will be

  • A database compiling existing publicly available spatial information for pastoral areas at regional scale
  • An analysis of the regional data, presented as a series of maps, to effectively communicate the insight in pastoral economies and biodiversity to guide decision-makers
  • In-depth insight into the status, trends and drivers of change for case study areas, to allow spatially explicit problem identification and targeting of investment opportunities
  • Compilation of existing economic data on the contribution of current land uses and biodiversity related goods and services to pastoral livelihoods and national and international economies as well as potential trade-offs.
  • Differentiated analysis of the way contributions flow to different socioeconomic subgroups among pastoralists, and whose land use decisions are positively or negatively affected as a result
  • Development domains to support investment decisions, building on IFPRI's recommendation for the ECA region.
  • In-depth analysis of relevant policies (including customary law), their effectiveness and their impact on pastoral livelihoods and sustainable natural resource management and conservation in selected pastoral areas based on defined parameters and international best practice
  • Scenario modeling of policy options in selected sites and identification of opportunities for policy harmonization and effectiveness at local, national and regional levels.
  • Catalyzing change through multi-stakeholder dialogues, policy dialogues and effective communication tools
  • Media briefings and press releases.

Project Funding Type

Direct

Participating Countries

Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania

Participating  institutions and country locations

Egerton University, Kenya
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Kenya
Resource Conflict Institute (RECONCILE), Kenya
Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) Marsabit and Kiboko centres
Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF), Tanzania
Relevant line Ministries in participating countries

Lead Institution

Egerton University, Kenya

Project Duration

3 years

Starting Date

October 2009

Ending Date

September 2011

Source of funding

USAID-EA

Amount of funding

US$ 440,977

Available

US$ 440,977

Shortfall

0

developing asareca gender mainstreaming strategy and early actions

Project code

018

 

Old Project Code

 

018

 

Goal

 

Gender responsive agricultural research systems for improved livelihoods.

 

Purpose

 

To create gender responsive institutions and research agenda for improved performance of agriculture sector while ensuring equitable distribution of resources and benefits to the various stakeholders.

 

Background/Rationale

Work from previous gender initiatives in PAAP led to recommendations that ASARECA should provide leadership in gender mainstreaming in the region. This was based on the appreciation that policy options for enhancing the performance of the agricultural sector in the sub-region should be gender sensitive. However, incorporating gender concerns routinely in the NARIs was hampered by lack of guiding policy frameworks. This went against the need to ensure that policy recommendations do not perpetuate gender inequalities but rather identify and address the needs and concerns of all beneficiary groups (such as poor rural women, men and youth). In recognition of this, ASARECA engendered its log frame and has developed a gender mainstreaming strategy and an early actions plan.

 

The objectives under the gender strategy are to:

 

  • develop positive attitudes towards gender mainstreaming in the NARS and key partners
  • influence donors and government agricultural policies to become more gender responsive
  •   secure adequate and equitable allocation of resources for GM
  • improve institutional commitment to gender mainstreaming

 

As part of its early actions in implementing the strategy, ASARECA is now conducting a gender audit within the secretariat. The audit is an internal assessment process of how gender issues are addressed in ASARECA program portfolios and internal organizational processes. The audit will identify gaps between gender policy and current practice and hence provide guidance on the best way to integrate gender policy into existing ASARECA practices and contexts. Current policy has now been outlined in the ASARECA Operational Manual and is currently undergoing review. The output will be a report of the audit for ASARECA and a brief on recommendations to fill the gaps. To augment the implementation of the recommendations derived an analysis of success stories in gender mainstreaming in the NARIs in the ECA and beyond will also be documented.

 

 

Project Funding Type

 

Direct

 

Participating Countries

 

All ASARECA member countries

 

Participating  institutions 

 

All ASARECA NARIs

 

Lead Institution

 

ASARECA/PAAP

 

Project Duration

 

3 years

 

Starting Date

 

2009

 

Ending Date

 

2011

 

Source of funding

 

MDTF

 

Amount of funding

 

US$ 414,859

 

Available

 

US$ 414,859

 

Shortfall

 

0

availability of policy information on agricultural sector performance

Activity code

020

 

Goal

 

Promotion of information exchange and sharing for improved agricultural policy analysis and advocacy.

 

Purpose

 

To facilitate sharing of information and knowledge that supports generation of scientifically based evidence for policy formulation and advocacy.

 

Background/Rationale

One of the key impediments to development has been that research results have not filtered in appropriate forms or in a timely fashion to be useful in policy formulation. PAAP seeks to address this research-policy disconnect through enhanced dissemination of critical and relevant policy information on topical regional issues to its diverse stakeholders. PAAP utilizes three main arms: establishment of agricultural policy networks; publications tailored to target end users and: support to various stakeholder dialogue and dissemination platforms.

 

 

The policy network's broad form of continuous interaction has mainly been through a bi-weekly electronic newsletter. The newsletter draws articles from a wide range of publications on issues relevant to regional policy. PAAP also publishes an annual stakeholders' directory that provides contacts of those involved in diverse policy arenas.

 

 

Publications from PAAP include training guides/manuals, policy briefs, monographs, etc. PAAP also provides several platforms for researchers and policy makers to engage in policy dialogue and advocacy for a more enabling policy and institutional framework for agricultural sector development. These platforms include stakeholder meetings, policy round tables, workshops and seminars.

 

 

Activity Funding Type

 

Direct

 

Participating Countries

 

All ASARECA member countries

 

Participating  institutions and country locations

 

All ASARECA NARIs

 

Lead Institution

 

ASARECA/PAAP

 

Activity Duration

 

4 years

 

Starting Date

 

2008

 

Ending Date

 

2011

 

Source of funding

 

USAID-EA  and World Bank MDTF

 

Amount of funding

 

US$ 99,043

 

Available

 

US$ 99,043

 

Shortfall

 

0

enhancing competitiveness of snap beans for domestic and export markets

Project code

P018-09-P2-01-001

Old Project Code

NSC/UGEN/09/01

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of sub-regional agricultural system

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of improved snap bean germplasm and management practices in Eastern and Central Africa

Background/Rationale

Snap beans (French beans) are growing in importance in the socio-economic systems of east and central Africa (ECA). It is a crop with great potential for addressing food insecurity and better incomes as well as poverty alleviation in the region. Compared to the dry (common) beans, snap beans obtain 12-fold the value of dry beans on dry weight basis in Kenya and Uganda. Snap beans are also harvested earlier and for a longer period than dry beans, and they require much less energy for cooking.
However, insect pests and diseases are major biotic constraints to snap bean production in ECA and contribute to the high yield losses prevalent on farms in the region. Farmers rely mainly on costly pesticides to control pests and diseases thus, increasing production costs and possible toxic accumulation of agrochemicals. The other production constraint in the region is low soil fertility.
Smallholder snap bean production is threatened by lack of affordable and marketable snap bean cultivars whose seed can be produced and disseminated through formal and informal seed delivery systems. Current varieties are patented by foreign multinational companies, which prohibit seed production by smallholder farmers. Deployment of resistance genes such as ur, and the use of other improved integrated snap bean production technologies, will reduce production costs.
This project was conducted for six months in 2006 before suspension of funding. Expected outputs include superior yielding varieties that are resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses, market information and integrated crop management technologies.

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream A

Participating Countries

Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania

Participating institutions and country locations

1. NARO_NaCCRI - Namulonge, Uganda
2. KARI - Thika, Kenya
3. University of Nairobi - Nairobi, Kenya
4. ISAR - Butare, Rwanda,
5. SARI - Arusha, Tanzania

Lead Institution

NARO_NaCCRI - Namulonge

Project Duration

23 months

Starting Date

August 2009

Ending Date

June 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 394,606

Available

Shortfall

processing for commercial exploitation of selected tree-fruits and vegetables in tanzania and rwanda

Project code

P019-09-P2-02-002

Old Project Code

NSC/TIIS/09/01

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the sub- regional agricultural system

Purpose

Enhanced utilisation of selected fruits and vegetables post harvest technologies in the ECA

Background/Rationale
Tanzania and Rwanda have a wide range of agro-climates suitable for the production of a wide range of agricultural products, but in many of these agro-climatic zones the available production potential is not fully utilised. For example, Tanzania has the potential to produce 2,000,000 metric tons of fruit worth at least US $ 900,000. In addition, approximately 1,200,000 metric tons of vegetables valued at US $ 530,000 can be produced annually.
The most important fruits that are produced include pineapples, passion fruits, citrus fruits, mangoes, peaches, pears and bananas, while vegetables include amaranthus, tomatoes, spinach, cabbages, and okra. The local markets for fresh fruits and vegetables are only available during the peak harvest. Furthermore, the bulk of fruits and vegetables in these countries, ranging from about 40 to 60%, are wasted due to lack of processing and preservation knowledge and facilities.
The current supplies of locally processed products are inadequate and do not meet quality requirements of local as well as international markets. The challenge however, is for the processors to be well trained in appropriate technologies and equipped with facilities that guarantee the production of high quality processed products. Processing and value addition will offer better prices for the products and enhance revenue generation, thereby the farmers being able to access other welfare amenities. The project will build the capacity of small-scale food processors through training in processing and marketing skills. Outputs expected from this project include knowledge materials, personnel and available technologies along the value chain.

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream A

Participating Countries

Tanzania, Rwanda

Participating  institutions and country locations

1. Sokoine University of Agriculture - Morogoro, Tanzania
2. MARI - Mikocheni/Dar es Salaam, Tanzania,
3. ISAR - Butare, Rwanda,
4. Community Food Processing and Training Centre - Morogoro, Tanzania

Lead Institution

Sokoine University of Agriculture

Project Duration

22 months

Starting Date

September 2009

Ending Date

June 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 549,193.35

Available

 

Shortfall

 

transfer and dissemination of proven and emerging agricultural technologies in quality protein maize (qpm) in eca

Project Code:      P059-08-P7-01-001

 

Goal:                                     Improved livelihoods and increased economic growth for resource poor farmers in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA)

 

Purpose:                               Enhanced uptake and adoption of QPM technologies in DRCongo, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.   

 

Project Background/Rationale:

Available proven and emerging technologies on the production, post-harvest, processing/value addition and utilization technologies in quality protein maize can contribute substantially to improved nutrition and livelihood of smallholder farmers and other poor households particularly in rural areas in the sub-region. Past research and dissemination work done under ECAMAW regional network demonstrated the potential from improved high yielding maize varieties rich in protein. Among the proven varieties are Longe 5 for Uganda and D R Congo; Lishe K1 in Tanzania; WS104 and KH631Q in Kenya. The value addition technologies such as using the QPM grain in production of feeds has potential to improve productivity of poultry and pigs and can open up opportunities for small scale agro-enterprises based on QPM grain. Research has also demonstrated that QPM grain can be used to make donats, cakes, and other products. Scaling up the dissemination, utilization and outcome of these technologies can significantly contribute to nutrition, health, incomes and livelihoods of rural communities in the ECA.

 

Like in the case of OFSP, this project too is building on these past achievements to scale out and up these technologies by applying and studying scaling up approaches built around the agricultural product value chain and on the IPTA framework. Similarly, the lessons learning inbuilt in the project aims to generate and disseminate lessons on the IPTA approach for scaling up technology and knowledge. The approaches and strategies being used, tested and validated through this project include partnership arrangements and processes for establishing local level seed systems, for promoting uptake of improved agronomic and production practices, for promoting value addition technologies and linking producers to markets for grain and QPM-based products.

 

Project Funding Type:                                   

 

It is part of the FARA Africa-wide programme called Dissemination of New Agricultural Technologies in Africa (DONATA) and was commissioned through Direct Award

 

 

Participating countries: D R. Congo, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location:

 

D R Congo:                INERA working with local institutions in Gandajika and Mwene Ditu districts in the central province               

Kenya:                                        KARI, working with local NGO institutions and private sector in Embu, Kilifi and Kirinyaga districts

Tanzania:                  SARI working with NGO partners and private sector in Muheza, Kilosa and Kilindi districts in Morogoro region.

Uganda:                      NARO working with local partners in Gulu and Lira districts

 

Lead Institution:               CIMMYT is providing technical backstopping to the NARI focal institutions in each target country

 

Project Duration:              4.5 years  

           Starting Date           1st July 2008

          Ending Date                31st December 2012

Source of Funding            African Development Bank (AfDB) through FARS

Amount of Funding         US$1,301,482     

Available                             US$1,301,482

transfer and dissemination of proven and emerging agricultural technologies in orange fleshed sweet potato (ofsp) in eca

Project Code:      P060-08-P7-01-002

Goal:                                     Improved livelihoods and increased economic growth for resource poor farmers in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA)

 

Purpose:                               Enhanced uptake and adoption of OFSP technologies in Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda.   

 

Project Background/Rationale:

Available proven and emerging technologies on the production, post-harvest, processing/value addition and utilization in orange flesh sweet potatoes have enormous potential to contribute to improved nutrition and livelihood of smallholder farmers and other poor households particularly in rural areas in the sub-region. Past research and dissemination work done under PRAPACE demonstrated the potential for improved high yielding OFSP varieties rich in vitamin A such as Jewel, Kabode, Ejumula, and Vita on livelihoods. It has shown that the improved varieties can contribute significantly to livelihoods and address the challenges of vitamin A deficiency among vulnerable people in communities, especially young children and pregnant women. Scaling up the dissemination, utilization and outcome of these technologies can significantly contribute to nutrition, health, incomes and livelihoods of rural communities in the ECA.

 

This project is building on these past achievements to scale out and up these technologies by applying and studying scaling up approaches built around the agricultural product value chain and on innovation platform for technology adoption (IPTA) framework. The lessons learning inbuilt in the project aims to generate and disseminate lessons on IPTA framework for scaling up technology and knowledge.  The approaches and strategies being used, tested and validated through this project include partnership arrangements and processes for establishing local level quality seed multiplication and distribution systems, for promoting uptake of improved agronomic and production practices, for promoting value addition technologies and linking producers to markets for sweetpotato tuber, vines and OFSP-based value added products.

 

Project Funding Type:                                    It is part of the FARA Africa-wide programme called Dissemination of New Agricultural Technologies in Africa (DONATA) and was commissioned through Direct Award

 

Participating countries:                                  Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda   

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location:

 

Ethiopia:     EIAR/AARC working with local institutions in Awassa region       

Kenya:        KARI, working with local NGO institutions in Kakamega and Busia districts

Rwanda:     ISAR working with NGOs. The target areas are Muhanga, Nyamagambe, Kamonyi and Rwamagana districts

Tanzania: LZARDI working with NGO partners in the lake zone region in Mwanza.

Uganda:      NARO working with partners including FAO, district farmers' associations and NGOs in Gulu and Lira districts

Lead Institution:               International Potato Center (CIP)

Project Duration               4.5 years  

           Starting Date         1st July 2008

          Ending Date      31st December 2012

Source of Funding            African Development Bank (AfDB) through FARA

Amount of Funding         US$ 1,597,371    

Available                              US$ 1,597,371 

scaling up farmer-led seed enterprises for sustained productivity and livelihoods in eastern and central africa

Project Code: P056-09-P7-01-003

 

Goal:                                     Enhanced utilization of agricultural technologies and innovations in eastern and central Africa

 

Purpose:                               Increased and sustainable smallholder access to quality AIV seeds in Kenya and Tanzania.

Project Background/Rationale:

The project aims to contribute to three ASARECA results areas, namely facilitating uptake of demand driven technologies and innovations; strengthening capacity of stakeholders to implement agricultural research for development; and enhancing the availability of information on agricultural innovations. As an action research oriented project, it will deliver knowledge products in terms of best practice approaches for establishment and scaling up of viable farmer-level seed enterprises for important crops that are not covered well by private sector seed companies. The knowledge sharing elements inbuilt in the project approach will promote catalyzing spillovers and promote uptake in other ASARECA countries helping reducing shortcomings that often occur in small scale seed enterprises.

 

Project Funding Type:  Competitive Grant

 

Participating countries:  Kenya, Tanzania

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location:     

 

Kenya:                   Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kisii; Technical Adoption through Research organization (TATRO) a local CBO; Kenya Seed Company. The project site is in Western Kenya

 

Tanzania:             HORTI Tengeru; Tanzania Official Seed Certification Institute (TOSCI); INADES Formation Tanzania based in Dodoma; The world Vegetable Centre Regional Centre for Africa (AVRDC-RCA). The project site is in Dodoma

Lead Institution:       CABI Africa

Project Duration:                              2 � years (31 Months)

           Starting Date            1st December 2009

Ending Date                                30th June 2012

Source of Funding:           MDTF

Estimated Amount of Funding:   US$ 581,440

Available                            US$ 581,440

scaling up technologies in orange fleshed sweetpotato using the agricultural innovation system to address food and nutrition security in eastern and central africa

Project Code:                      P056-10-P7-01-006           

 

Goal:                                     Improved livelihoods and sustainable food security and livelihoods in post-conflict areas in ECA

 

Purpose:                               Enhanced utilization of proven technologies by end-users in selected post-conflict countries in ECA               

 

Project Background/Rationale:

Although some progress on the millennium development goals (MDG) targets to reduce hunger and poverty has been noted in some developing countries, especially in Asia, food insecurity and high rates of malnutrition including vitamin A deficiency among young children remains a serious problem in many rural communities in eastern and central Africa (ECA). Malnutrition, especially vitamin A deficiency among young children undermines their disease resistance and growth, and increases mortality. Improved varieties of sweetpotato known as orange fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP) have been proved to have enormous potential to address both challenges of food insecurity and malnutrition associated with vitamin A deficiency. The varieties are both high yielding and are able to provide the daily requirements of vitamin A for young children, pregnant women and other vulnerable groups in poor countries. In addition, improved post harvest handling practices including processing technologies have also been shown to increase their utilization and value. Coupled with the rise in population growth and high rates of urbanization characteristic in virtually all ECA countries, improved technologies such as OFSP present opportunities for poor households to increase productivity, improve their food and nutrition security and also to generate income through agro-enterprise development and improved marketing.

 Results from the on-going OFSP project under DONATA indicate that application of the agricultural innovation can enhance the utilization and impact of these technologies. This project aims to also generate lessons on application of the AIS in scaling out/up the technologies.

.Project Funding Type:  Competitive Grant

 

 

Participating countries:  The countries that were included in the winning proposal are Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. The project will be implemented in areas where the current DONATA OFSP is not present.

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location     

 

Tanzania:            Lake Zone Agricultural Research Institute (LZARDI), an NGO called KOLPING

Kenya:                  Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) Kakamega; Ugunja Community Resource Centre.

Uganda:               BRAC, a private sector micro-finance and marketing organization; Gulu University, and farmer groups in northern Uganda

The International Potato Center (CIP) regional office in Kenya will provide technical backstopping

 

Lead Institution:            Lake Zone Agricultural Research Institute (LZARDI),                

Project Duration             The project is planned to run for about 2.5 years.

           Starting Date           May 2011

Ending Date               30th September 2013

Source of Funding      MDTF

Amount of Funding:        US$   1,000,000

 Available                               US$   1,000,000

scaling up technologies in quality protein maize (qpm) using the agricultural innovation system to address food and nutrition security in eastern and central africa

Project Code:                      P056-10-P7-01-007           

 

Goal:                                     Improved livelihoods and sustainable food security and livelihoods in post-conflict areas in ECA

 

Purpose:                               Enhanced utilization of proven technologies by end-users in selected post-conflict countries in ECA               

 

Project Background/Rationale:

Results from the Dissemination of New Agricultural Technologies in Africa (DONATA) project on quality protein maize funded by African Development Bank indicate enormous potential of QPM technologies to significantly increase food, nutritional security and income growth for many smallholder producers including women and various vulnerable groups especially in rural communities. Some good foundations for scaling up and out the technologies have started to take shape in most of the participating countries. Innovation platforms have been established and investments undertaken on sensitization and capacity building of potential beneficiaries and adapting of models for improving farmer access to technology inputs especially quality seeds. However, the potential for technology adoption at scale, improvement in productivity and impact on food and nutrition security is unlikely to be optimized because of some gaps in the design, structure and application of the innovation system. This project is targeted to expand in other districts while addressing issues identified from lessons learnt in the DONATA project during various M&E, mid-term review and annual reviews among which included the following: (a) Limited application and understanding of the agricultural innovation system in scaling out/ up the technologies to enhance adoption and impact on food and nutrition security and incomes. The major issue identified here was the problem in the platforms design where there is short term partner arrangement for only one year which is inadequate to sustain the envisaged learning and innovation necessary to catalyze and sustain adoption. It is also too short a period to realize scaling out/up of the technologies and in sufficient scope to bring about desired outcomes and impacts at household level. (b) Mutual learning through exchange visits, experience sharing and innovation will be emphasized as a key element of the agricultural innovation system. (c) Limited attention to value chain upgrading. Linkage with SG2000 with great experience in one stop centre approach and QPM saturation method will be adopted to strengthen business development capacity that will enable the groups to access financial services and collective marketing.


Project Funding Type:  Competitive Grant

 

 

Participating countries:  The project will be implemented in DR Congo, Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda but in areas where the current DONATA QPM project is being implemented.

 

Participating Institutions and Country Location     

 

D R Congo:                INERA working with local institutions

 

Kenya:                                        KARI, working with local NGO institutions and private seed companies

Tanzania:                  SARI working with NGO partners and a private sector seed company.

Uganda:                                      National Crops Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI) under the National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO), to work with Sassakawa Global 2000 and local cbos

Lead Institution:               National Crops Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI) 

Project Duration           The project is planned to run for about 2.5 years.

           Starting Date           May 2011

Ending Date               30th September 2013

Source of Funding      MDTF

Amount of Funding:        US$        600,000

 Available             US$        600,000

scaling up establishment of collaborative national agricultural information and knowledge management platforms

Project Code:                      P056-10-P7-01-008           

 

Goal:                                     Enhanced sustainable productivity of smallholder farming sub-sector in selected ECA countries

 

Purpose:                               Enhanced accessibility to agricultural information among stakeholders in selected ECA countries 

 

Project Background/Rationale:

Although there have been tremendous developments in the region on modern information, communication technology (ICT) that can enhance access and sharing of agricultural information and knowledge, much of the scientific and technical information generated within the region is still not yet widely accessible to stakeholders. The success of the pilot Kenya Agricultural Information Network (KAINet) in establishment of institutional and national electronic repository of agricultural information network, demonstrates that national agricultural systems (NARS) can collaboratively establish knowledge management platforms through which they can share their information. KAINet was established by the former Regional Agricultural Information Network (RAIN).

The objectives of the project are: (i) to synthesize and documents the lessons learned from this pilot; (ii) to scale up the lessons learnt and the notion of national agricultural knowledge management platforms into three or more countries; (iii) built capacity of relevant stakeholders in agricultural institutions to enhance their skills capacities to take advantage of emerging modern ICT to better manage, make available, share information in electronic formats; (iv) to advocate and support the development and promotion of appropriate policies and strategies that support and facilitate agricultural information management and exchange within the institutions and with the stakeholders both within and outside their countries. Potential countries that have expressed interest include Tanzania, Uganda and Rwanda

The project address the Knowledge Management and Upscaling Programme sub-theme "Improvement of communication and sharing of demand driven regional agricultural knowledge" and project area  "Development and operationalization of efficient knowledge generation, collection, processing, storing and access systems". It will be implemented in collaboration with ASARECA ICU.

 

Project Funding Type:  Competitive Grant

Participating countries: To be determined

Participating Institutions and Country Location:      To be determined

Lead Institution:   To be determined after competitive selection of sub-grantees

Project Duration               The project is planned to run for 16 months.

           Starting Date:          Not started

Ending Date:                             

Source of Funding      To be determined

Estimated Amount of Funding    US$        525,000

Available                              Nil

Shortfall                               US$        525,000

implementing the eca sector of the fara regional information and learning system (rails)

Project  Code


Goal

To enhance utilisation of information for regional agricultural R&D

Purpose

Regional information to support agricultural R&D generated

 

Activity Background/Rationale

FARA received funding from the AfDB to implement the RAILS project under the project titled: "promotion of science and technology for agricultural development in Africa ". This project will be implemented through FARA and the SROs (ASARECA, CORAF/WECARD, SADC-FANR).

The RAILS objectives are:

  • Advocacy for increased investment in agricultural information systems (AIS) by African governments and institutions;
  • Improve access to information and the ability to contribute to global agricultural knowledge by African stakeholders;
  • Facilitate synergies by linking African information conduits to global providers of agricultural information; and
  • Development of an African platform for agricultural information and learning systems. 


To achieve these objectives, FARA/RAILS works with the information and communication team of each SROs. These in turn partners with their member NARS. ASARECA is implementing the ECA component of  RAILS.

 

Activity Funding Type

   Other


Participating countries


All ASARECA countries


Participating Institutions and country location

 

All ASARECA Countries

Lead Institution

 ASARECA/ICU

Duration

6 years

Starting date

2008

Ending date

2012

Source of Funding

FARA/AfDB

Amount of Funding

$329,780

Available

$329,780

Shortfall

-

 

promoting sustainable natural resource management through effective governance and farmer market linkages in eca sub-region

Project Code: nrm/09/03

 

Goal:                             Enhanced sustainable productivity, value addition and competitiveness of the sub- regional agricultural systems

 

Purpose:                       To enhance adoption of sustainable NRM technologies

 

Project Background/Rationale

 

This project seeks to develop farmer-market value chains for selected enterprises as a stimulant to adoption of sustainable NRM practices, backed by strengthened NRM governance institutions. As part of the key project interventions, priority enterprises in project areas will be identified, value addition opportunities and constraints understood and cost-benefit analysis carried out to match most profitable enterprises with best-bet Natural Resource Management (NRM) options. The identified production, marketing and value addition opportunities will be piloted in three of the Eastern and Central Africa (ECA) countries, i.e., Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania.

 

As part of this process, existing NRM governance institutions are being assessed and strengthened. Farmer training will be carried out on group dynamics and leadership skills, investment opportunities, application of NRM best-bet options, value addition, resource mobilisation, marketing and marketing channels. The training will be conducted with an aim of enhancing farmers' capacities to engage in sustainable NRM. Strengthened dialogue platforms among value chain actors will facilitate information sharing and feedback to target production to market needs, thus building a sustainable producer-market chain. Visits to selected centres of excellence and participation in agriculture/trade shows will expose farmers to wider market opportunities. Results and lessons will be packaged and shared through different fora. The expected outputs therefore are:

 

a)       Value chains for selected enterprises in the project areas developed,

 

b)       Institutional arrangements for sustainable management of natural resources promoted,

 

c)       Capacity of farmers to engage in sustainable management of natural resources enhanced, and

 

d)      Knowledge, best practices, approaches and lessons learnt on sustainable NRM shared

 

Project Funding type: CGS stream a

Participating Countries: Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania

Participating Institutions and Country location: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Kenya; Kawanda Agricultural Research Institute, Uganda; Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania; Makerere University, Uganda and; Uganda National Farmers Federation (Uganda)

Lead Institution: Kawanda Agricultural Research Institute

Project Duration: 2 years

Starting date: 2009

Ending date: 2011

Source of funding: World Bank MDTF

Estimated amount of funding: $409,859

Available: US $409,859

Shortfall: 0

innovative approaches for mainstreaming integrated natural resource management in agricultural research and development institutions in eca sub-region

Project Code:              nrm/09/04

 

 

Goal:                             Enhanced sustainable productivity, value addition and competitiveness of the sub- regional agricultural systems

 

 

Purpose:                       To enhance the adoption of Integrated Natural Resource Management (INRM) approaches in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania

 

 

Project Background/Rationale

 

 

This project is designed to support mainstreaming of Integrated Natural Resources Management (INRM) into agricultural research and development agenda in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA) Sub-region. One key output of the project will be a strategy and pragmatic framework on mainstreaming INRM into agricultural research and development institutions in the sub-region.  The project will be implemented in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania with two action sites in each country.

 

 

Decades of continuous exploitation of natural resources in Eastern and Central Africa with little regard to their expedient management and conservation have led to the degradation of the resources, resulting in reduced productivity, low incomes, increased vulnerability and poverty among the numerous communities whose livelihoods depend on this natural endowment. On the other hand, substantial and successful work has been done within pilot sites and programs to mainstream INRM and its approaches and practices in the sub-region. Notable undertakings with successful stories include Landcare and African Highlands Initiative (AHI).

 

 

Despite the above opportunities for mainstreaming INRM and increasing the application of INRM approaches, it has not been adequately mainstreamed in agricultural research and development institutions due to a number of factors, among them, institutional barriers such as restricted access to INRM information on the grounds that it is "classified" and low appreciation of the role of natural resources in agricultural development.  This project therefore is designed to respond directly to these challenges by supporting institutional innovation for mainstreaming INRM and adoption of its approaches. The project will promote institutional collaboration to enhance biophysical synergies at farm and landscape levels, and support INRM through integrated technological, social, institutional and policy contributions. It's expected to deliver the following four outputs;

 

 

a)       A Strategy for mainstreaming INRM in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA) developed,

 

b)       National and institutional policy briefs on mainstreaming INRM are developed and promoted,

 

c)       Training on INRM mainstreaming approaches conducted, and

 

d)      Availability of information on mainstreaming INRM enhanced.

 

 

These outputs lead to increased utilization of INRM approaches and methods as an outcome. The project therefore responds to the Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA) NRM purpose (enhanced utilization of natural resources management innovations in ECA agricultural systems) and the Comprehensive Africa Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP) pillar 4.

 

 

Project Funding type: CGS stream a

 

Participating Countries: Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda

 

Participating Institutions and Country location: Kenya Forestry Research Institute, Kenya;  Rural Energy & Food Security Organization, Kenya and Kenya Agricultural research Institute, Kenya; Selian Agricultural Research Institute, Tanzania and; Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda

 

Lead Institution: Kenya Forestry Research Institute

Project Duration: 2 years

 

Starting date: 2009

 

Ending date: 2011

 

Source of funding: World Bank MDTF

 

Estimated amount of funding: US $ 552,835

 

Available: US $ 552,835

 

Shortfall: 0

efficient use of crop residues: animal feed versus conservation agriculture in eca sub-region

Project Code:              nrm/09/05

 

 

Goal:                             Enhanced sustainable productivity, value addition and competitiveness of the sub-regional agricultural systems

 

 

Purpose:                       To enhance adoption of best-bet options of crop-residue utilization in crop-livestock farming systems in Eastern and Central Africa

 

 

Project Background/Rationale

 

 

The project �Efficient Use of Crop Residues: Animal Feed versus Conservation Agriculture� is funded by Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA) under the competitive grant system (ASARECA-CGS). The project is designed within the context of the ASARECA Consolidated Conceptual Framework and with express aim of contributing to the realization of the ASARECA purpose. The ASARECA purpose is, Enhanced utilization of agricultural research and development innovations in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA). This project is expected to contribute to three out of the five outputs/results of ASARECA. These are:- the generation and uptake of demand driven agricultural technologies and innovations facilitated (Output 2), capacity for implementing .agricultural research for development in the ECA sub-region strengthened (Output 4) and Availability of information on agricultural innovations enhanced (Output 5).

 

 

Rationale for the project is founded on increasing food insecurity and poverty that are prevalent in most countries of ECA. The situation has been accentuated by lack of proper technologies and inadequate utilization of available technologies for management of natural resources for sustainable food production from both crops and livestock. Food production depends on the soil as a prime resource. The soil therefore requires management that will ensure continuous health in terms of nutrient cycling. Planted crops deplete a lot of nutrients from the soil and hence threaten its health. Crop residues management is therefore one of the aspects to look at when thinking of sustainable health soil. This is an approach that is cost-effective particularly for populations that are largely poor.

 

 

The amount of crop residues produced and the rate of decay vary among crops. While some decay fast, some may need to be ingested by animals and the dung returned to the soil as farmyard manure. The combination of the two factors determines the quality of residue in relation to its value for soil conservation, fertility management and livestock feed.

 

 

Literature review shows that since the inception of cultivating food crops, there has been numerous ways of disposing the residues by farmers such as burning, use as building material, fuel wood, manure and animal feed. Some of the options used hardly consider the concept of nutrient cycling so as to have health and sustainable soil environment. This project is therefore intended to explore various best-bet aspects of crop residue utilization in crop-livestock farming systems that will be friendly to the farmer and the environment (soil). The project will also introduce some conservation agriculture practices that will carter for both soil conservation and animal feed and hence reduce dependence on crop residues as animal feed.

 

 

The project envisages producing three results to achieve the project goal. These results are:-

 

 

a)       Best-bet options for the utilization of crop residues recommended and promoted

 

b)       Institutional capacity building to promote utilization of best-bet options of crop residues strengthened and

 

c)       Information availability and uptake of best-bet options for utilization of crop residues facilitated

 

 

During the project inception workshop, participants set farming system as main criteria for site selection and agreed that the project will be carried out in farming systems that practice both crop and livestock production, and that the livestock component can be 100 % confinement under zero grazing (to be named as FS1) or grazing with partial confinement of animals for supplementary feeding (to be named as FS2). The inception workshop also proposed that Tanzania to have FS1 (50 %) and FS2 (50 %), Kenya to have FS2 (75%) and FS1 (25 %), Uganda to have FS1 (50%) and FS2 (50 %) and Ethiopia to have FS2 (100 %).

 

 

Based on the agreed criteria, target study sites have been selected in Tanzania as Arumeru, Rombo and Babati districts (in Northern Tanzania), Kenya (Siaya district) and Uganda (Sironko and Manafwa districts around Mt. Elgon). In Ethiopia the project is located in Degem in North Shewa. Project results can be extrapolated to areas with similar farming system in ECA countries.

 

 

Project Funding type: CGS STREAM A

 

Participating Countries: Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and Ethiopia

 

Participating Institutions and Country location: Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Ethiopia; Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kenya; Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI), Tanzania and; Makerere University, Uganda

 

Lead Institution: Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI)

 

Project Duration: Two and half years

 

Starting date: May, 2009

 

Ending date: September 2011

 

Source of funding: World Bank MDTF

 

Estimated amount of funding: US $ 377,624

 

Available: US $ 377,624

 

Shortfall: 0

exploiting market opportunities for value added dairy and mat products in eca region

Project code

P021-09-P3-01-001

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 01 Ex.ASPRJ 27-ANM-PRJ 15 & ASPR J 29-02 ANM-PRJ 17.

Goal

The projects goal is enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the sub- regional livestock  system        

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of value addition innovations in the dairy and meat sub-sectors in eastern and central Africa

Background/Rationale
Various studies have shown that markets for agricultural products are rapidly changing in Africa with supermarkets expanding rapidly. These markets demand higher quality products which are currently largely supplied by large scale farmers and processors and imports. Off-farm small and medium scale enterprises and smallholder farmers that supply them find it difficult to penetrate these niche markets because of failure to meet the safety, quality and quantity of products demanded. Consumer incomes are also improving leading to expansion of demand for quality and safety by middle and high income consumer segments.
 Growing demand for quality milk and meat in Eastern Africa is driving new opportunities for value       addition.  However, significant technical and institutional barriers continue to limit the benefits of these changes to small-scale producers and market agents.  This study will assess dairy and meat products quality, and identify strategies to create value addition in new and growing markets.

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream A

Participating Countries

Kenya,  Tanzania, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Uganda, Southern Sudan

Participating  institutions and country locations

Kenya: Kenya Bureau of Standards; Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) and International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Kenya; Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) and ILRI in Ethiopia; Sokoine university of Agriculture (SUA)  of Agriculture, Animal Diseases Research Institute (ADRI) in Tanzania; Send a Cow, National University of Rwanda (NUR) and Umutara University in Rwanda; Agency for Inter-regional Development (AFID) and the National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO) in Uganda and Ministry of Agriculture, Equatoria State in South Sudan.

Lead Institution

Sokoine University of Agriculture

Project Duration

20 months

Starting Date

November 2009

Ending Date

June 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

715,207 US dollars

Available

 

Shortfall

 

integrated productivity enhancing technology packages for smallholder dairy farmers in eca

Project code

P022-09-P3-02-002

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 02  (EX. ASPRJ31-02ANM-PRJ19)

Goal

Enhanced productivity of Regional Animal Agriculture Systems.  

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of R4D innovations in smallholder dairy production systems in ECA

Background/Rationale
Low livestock productivity in crop-livestock systems of ECA is caused by the low genetic potential of the indigenous animals and poor management practices particularly on the aspects of health and nutrition. As a consequence, small-scale farmers live in poverty characterized by low incomes, food insecurity and poor social welfare. High population growth rate and rapid urbanization in the region have resulted into higher demand for livestock products that cannot be met domestically; leading to either food importation or aid. The hypothesis of this project is that increased availability and access to integrated livestock productivity enhancing technology packages by smallholder farmers will significantly contribute to sustainable increase of the system productivity.
Inadequate technology dissemination and adoption have multiple causes, including poor understanding of the needs and circumstances of farmers and the inability of unidisciplinary research to address interactions at the system level. Intensification of crop-livestock systems in the ECA region therefore, need a new research approach. The attractiveness of the Integrated Agricultural Research for Development (IAR4D) paradigm lies not only in its ability to combine cut-edge science to involve farmers and other stakeholders, but also in its emphasis on aspects of good resource management, markets and enabling policies, communication and knowledge sharing, promotion of the adaptive capacity of farmers and measures to overcome gender biases.
This project will therefore contribute towards ASARECA�s goal through intensification and diversification of crop-livestock systems by promoting integrated solutions namely; productivity enhancing technology packages (improved feeds and feeding, improved breeding and manure management practices), increased market access, better human nutrition, strengthened public-private partnerships and learning alliances and facilitate policy dialogue leading to an overall favorable production environment.
Major developmental challenges in crop-livestock systems are addressed; particularly food insecurity, poverty and inequity interrelationships, loss of soil fertility, loss of biodiversity, lack of supportive policies, malnutrition, HIV/AIDS, weak institutional support and lack of effective partnerships and information sharing.

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream A

Participating Countries

Rwanda and Tanzania

Participating  institutions and country locations

  ISAR, University of Rwanda and Send the Cow in    Rwanda; Sokoine University in Tanzania.

Lead Institution

Sokoine University of Agriculture

Project Duration

20 months

Starting Date

December   2009

Ending Date

June 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

349,965 US dollars

Available

 

Shortfall

 

improving livestock productivity through efficient utilization of available feed resources in eca

Project code

P023-09-P3-03-003

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 03. (Ex. ASPRJ14-02ANM-PRJ01)

Goal

The project goal is to enhance sustainable productivity and competitiveness of the sub-regional livestock production system.

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of livestock feed resources innovations to improve livestock productivity in ECA.

Background/Rationale
The Eastern and Central African region is characterized by a large fast growing human population, most of which live on less than a dollar per day. The region also carries over 60% of cattle and small ruminants in Africa. Both human and cattle populations subsist in varied types of systems, ranging from pastoral nomadic to urban and peri-urban settled lifestyles. With the rapid increase in human population, more rangelands are continually being converted to mixed-crop farming systems, a trend which is increasingly exerting pressure on the already dwindling natural resources. Notable among these constraints, is the scarcity of feed resources for livestock, which undoubtedly, is an invaluable source of livelihood for the majority of the population. The emerging constraints require application of appropriate technologies that would increase the availability of nutrients from the available feed resources to livestock while sustaining the environment.
Taking the fact that the level of industrialization in the region is low and a large proportion of the population is in the rural areas largely involved in agriculture, improvement of livelihoods is tied with agriculture. The economies of the countries in the region are largely agricultural, where livestock contributes as much as 34.5% of the agricultural GDP. However, Sub-Saharan Africa has moved from a moderate net exporter of meat in 1975 to a net importer by 1985. Projections show that demand for meat and milk will increase from 5.5 and 16.6 million tons in 2007 to 11.3 and 35.4 million tones respectively by 2020. The growth in projected demand and consumption for livestock products in Sub-Saharan Africa has in the process motivated further investment in long-term and short-term livestock productivity interventions. However, despite the trends, production has not met the increasing demand, hence forcing the countries of the ASARECA region to rely on imports from other countries in form of processed foods (A-AARNET 2005).
Technologies which improve productivity of livestock need therefore to be developed by scientists in conjunction with the livestock owners. The need to develop these technologies is urgent as current production practices are increasingly yielding less and constitute a threat to the environment because of the unsustainable intensity of resource use.

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream B

Participating Countries

Kenya; Tanzania, Uganda

Participating  institutions and country locations

  KARI and University of Nairobi in Kenya; SUA, Tanzania; NARO and Makerere University in Uganda.

Lead Institution

KARI

Project Duration

13 months

Starting Date

December 2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US $ 159,745

Available

 

Shortfall

 

establishment of a feed resources database for east and central africa

Project code

P024-09-P3-04-004

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 04. Ex. ASPRJ15-02ANM-PRJ02

Goal

To increase income and improve the livelihoods of livestock farmers in the target area.

Purpose

.Enhanced utilization of livestock feed resources and information innovations in ECA

Background/Rationale
Optimal feeding of livestock requires information on the nutritive value of the feeds to be fed. Such information is usually compiled in databases and stored in an electronic format or published in form of feedstuff tables (Doto et al., 2004). These useful tools for feed formulation and feed budgeting on-farm are lacking in the ECA region. One emerging concern in the region has been the failure to share existing information and technologies among the National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS). In addition, the variation in the method of analysis used to determine the quality of feeds among countries and institutions limit the scope of its utilization beyond the countries and even within countries in which the information was obtained. The current gaps in feed values require research to generate information and knowledge, which are pre-requisites in the formulation of sound databases. The proposed study will therefore collect, compile, collate, harmonize and document a user-friendly database. The database will facilitate publication of the feed table that can be used for efficient feed budgeting and formulation of cost-effective feed packages towards increased livestock productivity at farm level. The database, however, has to be updated from time to time as the information become available.

Project Funding Type

CGS- Stream B

Participating Countries

Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Uganda

Participating  institutions and country locations

  ISABU  in Burundi; Egerton University in Kenya; ISAR in Rwanda; Department of Research,  Ministry of Livestock,  and Sokoine University in Tanzania and Makerere University  in Uganda.

Lead Institution

Sokoine University of Agriculture

Project Duration

24 months

Starting Date

December  2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US $ 165,979

Available

 

Shortfall

 

testing and validation of breed survey methodology socio-economic survey and characterization of selected indigenous cattle of eastern and central africa. (lfp prj 05)

Project code

P025-09-P3-05-005

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 05.

Goal

Enhanced development and utilization of small ruminants genetic resources for sustainable productivity of livestock production systems in Eastern and Central Africa.

Purpose

Enhanced utilization of cattle breeding research and development innovations in the ECA.

Background/Rationale
Cattle keepers have definitive perceptions of the socio-economic attributes of Cattle Genetic Resources (CaGR), and their adaptive potential. This traditional knowledge has been the basis of their preference and choice of breeds and strains. However, its importance notwithstanding, indigenous knowledge has been generally ignored when developing policies and utilization strategies for the indigenous CaGR. Determination and documentation of livestock keepers' knowledge of the socio-economic attributes of indigenous cattle would promote their sustainable use, development and conservation, leading to enhanced food security, environmental protection and poverty reduction.
A systematic description of the indigenous Animal Genetic Resources (AnGR) under the prevailing production systems is fundamental to their sustainable use and development. Breed survey (inventory) and regular monitoring would provide information on available breeds, their population sizes and trends, as well as prevailing production systems that could be used to assess risk levels and conservation strategies. Inadequate awareness and documentation of the potential of indigenous breeds as well as inappropriate management approaches are some of the contributing factors to the prevailing unsustainable use of the breeds.
Characterization, which in most cases runs together with breed survey, aims at establishing the unique and special attributes of the cattle breeds. Many of such attributes are either known but remain unexploited or unknown by the livestock keepers. Currently, the science of molecular genetics offers several alternative options that can be used to estimate the genetic diversity and relationships between populations, within and between breeds. Given the rapid trend in this area, it is essential to collect and store genetic material in form of blood, sperm, ova, tissue for future use for breed reconstitution and development.
Since early 1990s, a number of genetic characterization studies have been undertaken to identify genetically distinct "breeds" of indigenous cattle of the ECA region. Some data have also been generated from breed surveys. Such data includes colored photographs of animals' representative of individual breeds/types. This information can now be used to initiate development of breed catalogues for the regions' CaGR. It will comprise colour photographs and brief description of breeds including distribution, physical characteristics, main uses, production systems, performance characteristics, major threats and extent of threat. The catalogues will be used as a quick breed reference document by a range of stakeholders.
.

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream B

Participating Countries

Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda

Participating  institutions and country locations

EIAR, Ethiopia; University of Nairobi, Kenya; Sokoine University, Tanzania; NARO, Uganda.

Lead Institution

Nairobi University

Project Duration

24 months

Starting Date

December 2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US dollars 163,160

Available

 

Shortfall

 

characterization of production traits, establishment of genetic potential for improvement of indigenous breeds of sheep and goats in east and central africa

Project code

P026-09-P3-06-006

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 06

Goal

To increase income and improved livelihoods of sheep and goat farmers in the target area.

Purpose

Enhance utilization of small ruminant breeding research and development innovations in ECA.

Background/Rationale
Small ruminants have not been adequately evaluated for their genetic potential in their prevailing production systems. The existing genetic and phenotypic variation observed for both meat, milk and diseases resistance has not been fully documented. The variation shows a clear potential for genetic improvements through selection (Indetie, et al. 1999). Description of the production system expands the value of characterization and may identify possible areas of potential impact on productivity. The characterization process will enable the formulation of conservation strategies for breeds and strains identified as being at risk and will promote the development of these breeds and strains for improved and sustainable productivity through efficient utilization.
Currently, the science of molecular genetics offers several techniques that can be used to estimate the genetic diversity and relationships between populations and within breeds. Marker assisted selection (MAS) can accelerate the rate of genetic progress by increasing accuracy of selection and reducing the generation intervals, given that MAS allows for selection decisions to be made very early in the life of the animals (Smith and Simpson 1986). The benefits of these techniques are greater for traits with low heritability, and those that are expensive or difficult to measure indirectly using the conventional methods.

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream B

Participating Countries

Eritrea, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania.

Participating  institutions 

National Agricultural Research Institute (NARI), Eritrea; KARI, Kenya; Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Rwanda (ISAR), Rwanda; Animal Diseases Research Institute (ADRI), Tanzania.

Lead Institution

KARI

Project Duration

24 months

Starting Date

December 2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US dollars 165,611

Available

 

Shortfall

 

tick and tick borne disease prevention and control in east and central africa

Project code

P027-09-P3-07-007

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 07. Ex. ASPRJ18-02ANM-PRJ06 

Goal

Improved sustainable cattle productivity and competitiveness of the livestock   sector in targeted area.  

Purpose

Enhanced the utilization of tick and tick-borne diseases management innovations.

Background/Rationale
The standards of tick control (using acaricides) in most African countries have adversely affected most of the livestock production systems, due to logistical and economic constraints faced by the farmers.  Most of these constraints are attributed to the withdrawal of subsidy by governments for TTBDs control that were vital incentives to the farmers.  As a result, the back-up services such as dipwash analysis, acaricide resistance testing and general technical and supervisory services have virtually broken down.  In addition, tick control facilities (such as communal dips) in many countries have fallen into a state of disrepair.  Consequently, the majority of farmers have resorted to hand-spraying, a practice that is fraught with many problems.  In places where field veterinary staff are poorly motivated, tick control practice is characterised by many malpractices that have serious health and environmental implications.  These include indiscriminate use of acaricides without professional guidance, lack of consistency in the choice of acaricides, and haphazard spraying of animals (Okello-Onen et al., 1998).  In some cases, the farmers use low volumes of acaricides made up in wrong dilutions.
The poor standards of TTBDs control may seriously undermine the recent efforts by several African governments to rehabilitate and expand livestock industry for increased production of milk, meat and other animal products.  These programmes are being accomplished through the importation of improved breeds of bulls and heifers and the use of artificial insemination to upgrade indigenous cattle breeds. However, they are producing cattle populations that are highly susceptible to TTBDs.  The beneficiaries of these programmes are the smallholder dairy farmers, whose numbers continue to increase. 
After nearly a century of using acaricides in Africa, it is now widely acknowledged that the technology has not created a significant impact on TTBDs (Dipeolu et al., 1992).  Historically, most control efforts have been targeted at the parasitic phase of hard ticks found on cattle.  However, hard ticks spend only ~3-5% of their total life span on-host.  Virtually, no effort has been directed at the non-parasitic off-host phase of hard ticks, constituting 95% (Punyua, 1992), that continue to perpetuate the species on the farms.  Moreover, most of the non-parasitic ticks feed on other alternative hosts (including game animals) on which no tick control measures have been attempted.
This project, therefore, seeks to identify, document and evaluate the various options for TTBD management under pastoral and agro-pastoral production systems in ECA, and formulate best-bet practices for TTBD control. This includes judicious use of acaricides, chemotherapy, immunization, and integrated approaches. A host of effective alternative methods for TTBD control have been documented and evaluated in eastern and central African sub-region, but not up-scaled to different livestock production systems.  This includes the use of anti-tick plants, plant-derived products and ethno-veterinary practices that present an effective and sustainable alternative strategy for integrated tick control (Malonza et al., 1992; Mwangi et al., 1995) in various livestock production systems in the ECA countries. 

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream B

Participating Countries

Burundi, Kenya, Madagascar, Tanzania, Sudan and Uganda

Participating  institutions 

Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Burundi (ISABU), Burundi; UoN, Kenya; Centre National de recherche Appliquee au Developpement Rural (FOFIFA), Madagascar; SUA, Tanzania; Ministry of Science and Technology-Central Veterinary Research Laboratory, Sudan; Gulu University, Uganda.

Lead Institution

  Gulu University

Project Duration

20 months

Starting Date

December 2009

Ending Date

June 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US $  228,393

Available

US $ 189,684

Shortfall

  US $ 38,709

crop-livestock integration for sustainable management of natural resources in eca

Project code

P028-09-P3-08-008

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 08.  Ex. ASPRJ19-02ANM-PRJ07

Goal

Enhanced productivity and competitiveness of integrated smallholder crop-livestock systems in ECA region

Purpose

Enhanced utilisation of smallholder crop-livestock integration innovations in ECA region.

Background/Rationale
Undesirable climate change and variability, high poverty levels, deteriorating soil fertility and per capita land and water resource base due to unabated population pressure; inadequate institutional arrangements and counterproductive policies in managing people and their livelihoods assets and unfavourable terms of trade due to globalisation are  major causes of chronic vulnerability of livelihoods in semi-arid zones of ECA region. The complex nature of vulnerability causative factors calls for an integrated approach combining adoption of crop-livestock production enhancing innovations, water harvesting and conservation and management as well as markets, institutional and policy innovations addressing the above specific causes of livelihoods vulnerability.
Currently, the world has entered an era of rising food prices including a sharp increase in milk, meat, wheat, rice and maize prices. One of the major causes of increase in the prices of crop and livestock products is the increased demand in the developing world. Rising fuel prices are also partly responsible for increasing food prices due to increased cost of transport and increased cost of production of inputs.
While the rising food prices are a global problem, it is particularly a major concern for the resource-poor populations in ECA region living on less than 1 dollar a. In the absence of viable economic alternatives, their vulnerability is increasing and they are increasingly unable to feed their families. However, all is not necessarily doomed as the rising prices are also an opportunity for smallholder farmers to increase their incomes and get out of poverty if appropriate technological, markets, credit, policy and institutional innovations are adopted to increase the production and marketing of their products.
Considering the increased demand for crop and livestock products, integrating market oriented dairy, indigenous chicken and vegetable production can be one of the best means to provide resource-poor smallholder farmers with regular cash income and improved diets based on food of animal origin and vegetables.
Aimed at building smallholder crop-livestock farmers' livelihoods resilience to the identified various causes of vulnerability, this project will build on the strengths and weaknesses observed during the implementation of the crop-livestock integration for natural resources management projects in other countries  to generate within learning alliances involving partners identified along the dairy, indigenous chicken  and vegetable value chains technological, social, policy and institutional innovations that will sustain the productivity of their land and livestock (natural capital), strengthen their social capital (farmers organizations, efficient institutions), improve the competitiveness of their dairy and vegetable enterprises while building their livelihoods resilience to the various causes of vulnerability.
At the core of the social learning through action research will be the generation and promotion of smallholder crop-livestock innovations for intensification of integrated dairy and vegetable production systems, asset diversification to off-farm sources of income, market, policy and institutional innovations and strengthening mechanisms to improve the resilience of integrated dairy and vegetable enterprises to the various causes of vulnerability. Strategies of the alliances for the project implementation will include action research to develop methods, tools and approaches for innovation, information exchange and knowledge management and capacity building of all actors within the alliances and along the dairy and vegetable value chains.

Project Funding Type

CGS Stream B

Participating Countries

Burundi, Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda

Participating  institutions and country locations

ISABU, Burundi; KARI, Kenya; Livestock Research Institute, Tanzania; NARO, Uganda.

Lead Institution

NARO

Project Duration

20 months

Starting Date

December 2009

Ending Date

June 2011.

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US $ 435,967

Available

 

Shortfall

 

contigency plans to mitigate the effects of crises in pastoral systems of eca

Project code

P029-09-P3-09-009

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 09 Ex. ASPRJ20-02ANM-PRJ08 

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of pastoral and agro-pastoral systems in the ECA                           

Purpose

  Enhanced utilization of pastoral and agro-pastoral research and development innovations in ECA

Background/Rationale
Pastoral people have developed a range of responses to crisis situations that accommodate socio-economic and ecological concerns.  But these have become increasingly ineffective because of growing populations, encroachment of cultivators and urban and infrastructural development on traditional grazing land and increasingly frequent crisis situations due to effects of climate change. This is selectively taking up the best dry season grazing because of requirements for water and it is also the best land for cropping.  The ineffectiveness of present remedies is evident from the increasing human suffering caused by droughts and other crisis.  Thus, new responses need to be developed which reinforce the traditional systems so that they can be adopted with minimal social disruption. Research is urgently required to explore alternative production practices and formulate strategies and policies to assist in buffering or re-establishing livestock production in pastoral systems before and after crises
The challenges posed by drought calls for strategies, methodologies and tools in three areas: (i) monitoring/tracking and forecasting (early warning) i.e., the ability to track and analyse environmental changes using reliable indicators; (ii) mitigation i.e., coping mechanisms that can be instituted in time to respond effectively to the environmental challenges; and (iii) resilience and recovery i.e., an ability to rebound from catastrophic events so as to sustain progress in human welfare and natural resource management in the long-term (Niamir-Fuller 1998).
When destabilizing events such as drought, civil strife, floods or other natural disasters occur, livestock producers suffer through animal mortality and depressed market prices.  This adverse situation is aggravated by policies and regulations that inhibit producers from seeking solutions to their own food insecurity problems. The losses incurred by livestock owners not only hurt their immediate livelihoods but, depending on the nature of the cause of the crises (drought, conflicts etc) can damage food security for up to five years as herds and flocks are rebuilt. In some cases where livestock owners have been especially hard hit they cannot recover from the crisis. There is therefore an urgent need to build capacity for anticipating, mitigating and promoting the recovery of the livestock sector when subjected to crisis situations.


Project Funding Type

CGS stream B

Participating Countries

Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania

Participating  institutions

Oromia Agricultural Research Institute (OARI), Ethiopia;  KARI, Kenya;  National Livestock Research Institute (NLRI), Tanzania.

Lead Institution

National Livestock  Research Institute, Tanzania

Project Duration

20 months

Starting Date

December 2009

Ending Date

June 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US $ 545,089

Available

US $ 545,089

Shortfall

 

strengthening regional germplasm collection and regional forage seed supply in eca

Project code

   P030-09-P3-10-010

Old Project Code

LFP PRJ 10.Ex.ASACT10-02ANM-ACT10                                                                        

Goal

Improving productivity and competitiveness of the regional animal agricultural  system through improved capacity for forage seed supply.

Purpose

Enhancing utilization of forage germplasm evaluation  and forage  seed production research and development innovations in ECA

Background/Rationale
The demand for high quality forage seed for development of livestock feed resources is increasing rapidly within the ECA region. This is fueled by the expanding beef and dairy production occasioned by the increased demand from rising population and improved income particularly in the urban centres. Availability of forage seed is critical to meet the expanding meat and milk demand in the region. Consequently there is need to have concerted effort by respective ASARECA member countries to improve seed availability. Forage seed production and seed supply systems in ECA region is not well developed compared with seed production for food crops. As a result seed procurement by farmers is mainly from their own cultivated pastures, relatives, friends and neighbours and is limited to a few forages species. Usually the quality of these seeds is not certified and is often poor. A wide range of forages is required to maximize the benefits from pasture development. Therefore, there is need to strengthen forage germplasm collection and seed multiplication at selected ecological zones in the ECA region to make a wide range of species available.
International institutions such as ILRI have limited quantity of seeds in their gene bank and do not have the capacity to supply enough seeds to the various and numerous demand from national institutions, private sector or development agencies operating in the region. There is good prospect of strengthening and increasing forage seed availability among ECA regions by identifying best environment for seed production for each forage species. This can be achieved through established linkages between institutions and improved seed movement and exchange in the region.


Project Funding Type

  CGS Stream B

Participating Countries

Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania,   Uganda.

Participating  institutions 

ISABU, Burundi; NARI, Eritrea; EIAR, Ethiopia; KARI,  Kenya; ISAR, Rwanda; Agricultural Research Corporation (ARC), Sudan; NLRI, Tanzania; NARO, Uganda.

Lead Institution

KARI

Project Duration

  20 months

Starting Date

  December 2009

Ending Date

June 2011.

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US $ 330,000

Available

 

Shortfall

 

napier grass smut and stunt resistance

Project code:                       P032-09-P3-12-012

Old Project Code:              LFP PRJ 12

Project Goal:                       Enhanced productivity of smallholder dairy in ECA

Project purpose:                 Mitigate the effects of Napier diseases on smallholder dairy in ECA

 

  

Napier grass head smut (smut) and Napier grass stunt disease (stunt) are having a serious effect on smallholder dairy farmers in East Africa. Both diseases cause stunted plants with low biomass that are unable to sustain the feed requirements of dairy cows.  Farmers are forced to reduce herd size with related reduction in farm income in the absence of alternative feeds.  Currently stunt is most prevalent in Western Kenya and Uganda but is spreading in the region and recently was also recorded in Northern Tanzania.  Orodho (2006) wrote that "unless resistant cultivars of Napier grass and alternatives are found, the smallholder dairy industry will be in trouble".  In Western Kenya, farmers are pressing NARS researchers for a solution to the severe losses that they suffer due to stunt. This concern is widely shared by farmers in neighbouring countries in the region. Researchers in Uganda are also concerned about the possible impact on their dairy sector. "Intensive dairy production which has been a major toolkit in the household poverty reduction schemes and emancipation of women is reliant on Napier grass. However Napier Stunt Disease is an emerging threat to the feed base that needs to be contained before it attains crisis levels" (NARO research call 2006).  

 

Although more restricted in its distribution, smut is causing a similar threat in the highlands of Kenya.  Farrell (1998) reported that farmers had to sell cattle due to declining Napier grass yield due to smut. KARI have already identified a Napier grass resistant to smut, Kakamega 1, from the ILRI in trust germplasm collection.  News of the resistant variety spread in an informal manner and KARI-Muguga is now well-known as a source of planting materials of the resistant clones for farmers and extension staff.  From 2001-2004 a total of 1931 individuals and 23 groups have received planting material from KARI-Muguga.  A Parent Teacher Association established a bulking site and distributed an estimated 10,000 splits to 1,000 farmers, starting with the 300 parents at the school. While demand for smut resistant clones is high, Kakamega 1 is less productive than the best local varieties and is not fully satisfying the demands of local farmers.  Alternative high yielding resistant clones are still required to meet demand.

 

The clonal nature of Napier grass and planting and management practices promote spread of the diseases.  A combined package of management practices and use of resistant clones provides the best option to halt spread of the disease and reduce impact on the smallholder dairy industry in the region.  While the NARS in the region have existing capacity in disease management and close links with extensions services and farmers to raise awareness of potential impacts and control, they do not have access to diagnostic tools for rapid identification of the diseases nor resistant clones to stunt disease.

 

This project will provide these technologies and build capacity in their application to address the project purpose of mitigating the impact of these diseases on the smallholder dairy sector. 

 

Project funding type:                        CGS Stream C

Participating countries:                   Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania

Participating institutions:                KARI and ILRI, Kenya; NARO, Uganda; National Biological Control Program, Tanzania; EIAR and ILRI, Ethiopia.

Lead institution :                                ILRI

Duration :                                             3 years

 a) Starting date:                                  2007

 b) Ending date:                                  2010

Status:                                                   Was completed in June 2010

 

Source and amount of funding:      AfDB, US $ 600,300

enhanced management of banana xanthomonas wilt for sustainable banana productivity in eca

Project code

Old Project Code

P003-09-PI-003

SC/BXW/09/03

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the banana sub sector in ECA

Purpose

Increased utilisation of innovations for sustainable management of BXW in ECA

Background/Rationale

Banana Xanthomonas Wilt is a new disease that has been devastating bananas in East and Central Africa since 2001. The disease caused by a bacterium (xanthonus campertris p.v. nusacearum) has spread to D.R. Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Farmers and other stakeholders lack the capacity (knowledge, skills and resources) for sustainable management of the disease. A number of national programs have attempted to address the disease but there are still gaps on the information regarding the bacterium causing the disease. There is also need to validate and scale out some of the disease management options that have been developed.

This project will build upon the crop crisis project implemented by CRS in the six countries. Best bet technologies will be identified from existing inventory evaluated and promoted. Studies will be carried out to generate information to fill gaps on disease identification, survival and dissemination. Capacity of scientists, extension agents and institutional programme supporting banana research and development to effectively utilise skills in research and management of BBW will be strengthened through sharing of experiences.

Project nature

Commissioned Direct Award

Participating countries

Burundi, D.R. Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania

Participating Institutions and Country Locations

ISABU, Burundi; INERA, Congo; KARI-KIISI, University of Nairobi, Kenya; ISAR, RADAR,and University of RWANDA, RWANDA; NARO-NaCRRI, Uganda; DRD - Ukiriguru, Tanzania; Sokoine University, Morogoro, Tanzania.

Lead Institution

Bioversity Intenational

Duration

25 months, 1st July 2009-31st - August 2011

Starting Date:
Ending Date:

July 2009
August 2011

Source of funding

MDTF/ WB and USAID

Amount of Funding

US$ 967,350

Available

US$ 483,675

shortfall

US$ 483,675

development and dissemination of quality protein maize agro-enterprises for improved household income in eca

Project code

P004-09-P1-004

Old Project Code

SC/QPMA/09/04

Goal

Enhanced Sustainable Productivity Value added and competitiveness of QPM in ECA

Purpose

Enhanced Utilization of Technologies and innovations for sustainable Productivity of QPM

Background/Rationale

Although maize is one of the most important staple foods consumed throughout The Horn and East Africa, conventional maize varieties are deficient in two essential amino acids - lysine and tryptophan - so that populations dependent upon this crop may suffer from protein malnutrition. The potential contribution of Quality Protein Maize (QPM) to improving human nutritional status has been accorded worldwide attention in recent years-highlighted with the award of the World Food Prize for 2000 to the CIMMYT scientists who launched the research effort on QPM more than 30 years ago. QPM cultivars contain 70-100% more lysine and tryptophan than most conventional maize varieties; hence, the nutritional quality of the protein in QPM grain approaches that of protein derived from cow's milk. This essential aspect of enhanced protein quality has been combined with another important feature: QPM is virtually indistinguishable from conventional maize in terms of grain appearance and texture- as well as the consumer acceptance of maize-based food products made with QPM. The ECA region has been severely affected by HIV/AIDS pandemic which reduce labour productivity resulting in negative impact on Agriculture. Good nutrition is known to ameliorate the conditions of aids victims.

Studies have demostrated that QPM can prevent Kwashiorkor in young children (CIMMYT, 2002). Besides its obvious significance in human health, QPM is known to play an increasingly important role in reducing the protein supplement in animal feed if used as an ingredient. In addition QPM can be used as igredient in preparation of composite flours to supplement wheat flour for bread, cakes and biscuit preparation. Composite flours are used in a number of countries in ECA. Since farmers are able to grow their own maize savings are made on more expensive wheat flour that is mostly imported. In Tanzania, for example, one company named Nyirefami in Arusha is already making and packaging QPM for use in homes. Currently there is high demand for technologies that can reduce the cost of production of processed goods in order to make their business competitive. The project aims at using QPM as a source of entrepreneurship for several people, as agro-based enterprises and associated products will help improve their household incomes.

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream A

Participating Countries

Uganda, Kenya,and Tanzania.

Participating countries and institutions

Uganda: NARO-NaCRRI, Makerere University, FICA Seeds,
Tanzania:
DRD- Salien (SARI), Nyirefami, Arusha.

Kenya: KARI-Embu, KARI-Katumani.

CIMMYT

Lead Institution

NARO-NaCRRI-Uganda

Project Duration

25 Months

Starting Date

July 2009

Ending Date

August 2011

Source of Funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 351,300

Available

US$ 351,300

Shortfall

-

integrated management options for sustainable lowland rice legumes cropping systems

Project code

P005-09-P1-05-005

OldProject Code

SC/SLRLCS/09/05

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of lowland rice-legume cropping system in target areas of ECA

Purpose

Enhanced Utilization of technologies forSustainable Productivity of Lowland Rice-Legume Cropping Systems in target areas of ECA

Background/Rationale

The project seeks to develop technologies that will overcome constraints of establishing legumes on residue soil moisture after the lowland rice in target areas of ECA countries. The major outputs of this project are demand driven tillage and sequential cropping knowledge and technologies that permit establishment of legumes after lowland rice generated, capacity of stakeholders to utilise the technologies strengthened and availability and sharing of the knowledge and information across ECA enhanced.Rice contributes significantly to food security in ECA. However, rice-rice mono cropping due to unfavourable soil conditions underutilises land and water resources, depletes nutrients and may cause build up of pests and diseases. There is a need of technologies that allow growth of second crops after rice while ensuring sustainability.

Technologies to permit legumes establishment after rice will increase productivity of soil and water resources while enhancing sustainability through improvement of soil fertility.This will increase food production, allow diversification and improvement of nutritional quality and the income. The main beneficiaries are the lowland rice smallholder farmers in ECA region. The project is unique that it aims at integrating crop, soil and water management options and markets to develop technologies that would enable sustainable utilisation of soil and water after the lowland rice. Through participatory methodologies the project will identify rice and legume varieties that are socially and economically suitable for the lowland rice-legume cropping system in target areas of ECA. It will then review tillage practices that can overcome soil constraints and enable growing of legumes after the rice crop. Review of tillage practices will be followed by field experiments to validate and promote the best-bet technologies. We hypothesize that integrated management options for rice-legume based cropping system will contribute significantly to soil and water productivity, improved household food security, nutrition and income while sustaining the

Project Funding Type

Funding Stream A

Participating countries

Tanzania, Madagascar, and DR. Congo

Participating countries and institutions

DRD Mlingano (Tanzania), INERA, University of Kinshasha (DR Congo), FOFIFA, Regional Directorate of Rural Development (Madagascar)

Lead Institution

DRD Mlingano, Tanzania

Duration

23 Months

Starting Date

September 2009

Ending Date

August 2011

Source and amount of funding

MDTF

Amount of Funding

US$ 343,426

Available

US$ 343,426

Shortfall

-

integrated technologies for drought mitigation and increasing smallholder sorghum productivity

Project code

 P006-09-P1-06-006

 

Old Project Code

SC/ITDMSP/09/06

Goal

Increased economic growth and improved livelihoods in the ECA while enhancing the quality of the environment

Purpose

Enhanced sustainable productivity of smallholder sorghum systems in drought prone areas of the participating countries in ECA region

 

Background/Rationale

 

Nearly sixty percent of agricultural land in the ECA region is found in semi-arid areas and are prone to drought stress.  Sorghum is the dominant food crop in these areas as other cereals are not well adapted to the harsh dry conditions. Millions of people living in these areas are confronted with crop production challenges posed by nature. Besides frequent drought, and low and highly variable rainfall, infestation by parasitic weed Striga, low soil fertility and insect pests contribute to low sorghum yield in these areas. A number of drought management technologies such as drought tolerant and Striga resistant varieties, water and soil management practices have been developed to mitigate drought effects in sorghum production.  However, farmers have not realised the full benefits of these due to lack of availability of the technologies in integrated fashion. The results of the study will be used primarily by small scale farmers, governmental and non-governmental organisations engaged in the promotion of agricultural development, agricultural research organisations and personnel engaged in policy formulation and implementation. The research procedures will involve in depth analysis of the existing production practices in the target areas, documentation of improved technologies recommended for these areas and analysis of physical resource base for crop production in the area such as long term weather data soil fertility and management conditions. Combination of existing technologies (drought tolerant varieties, water harvesting mechanisms, appropriate tillage practices) will be tested under farmers' conditions. Inputs will be made to support (bring to completion) of existing efforts to develop more stable drought tolerant varieties using marker assisted breeding techniques.

 

 

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream A

Participating Countries

Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Tanzania and Sudan

Participating  institutions and country locations

Ethiopia,  Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Eritrea, National Agricultural Research Institute    Kenya, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Sudan, Agricultural Research Corporation and Tanzania, DRT Uyole Research Institute

Lead Institution

EIAR

Project Duration

27 Months

Starting Date

October 2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 370,231.70

Available

US$ 370,231.70

Shortfall

-

mega project on improved cassava productivity and utilisation in eastern and central africa. a project to unlock cassava potential in eastern and central africa

Project code

P007-09-P1-07-007

Old Project Code

SC/CBSD/09/07

Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the cassava sub-sector in ECA

Purpose

Enhanced utilisation of technologies and innovations for sustainable productivity of cassava in ECA

 

Background/Rationale

 

Cassava is a major staple crop for more than 200 million people in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA). It is the second most important staple crop in Africa after maize. The crop has been prioritised by NEPAD as a "poverty fighter" that will spur industrial development in Africa. It has also been identified by COMESA as one of the strategic crops to be addressed under CAADP pillars 2 (improving infrastructure and trade related capacities for market access) and 3 (increasing food supply and reducing hunger). The ASARECA strategy (2007 - 2016) points to the fact that the biggest impact on poverty reduction will come from concentrating on staple crops with cassava ranking highest among the staples with a growing market.

 

Production and utilisation of cassava is constrained by a number of factors. The most critical among these are lack of novel technologies to improve productivity and lack of frameworks to enhance marketing and improvement of value chains and endemic diseases (especially viral) and pests. A pandemic of cassava mosaic disease (CMD) has been devastating cassava production in ECA over the last decade. Over the last few years, cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) has been spreading fast over the region exacerbating the risk in the entire region already adversely affected by CMD.The Cassava Mega Project is an ASARECA initiative to address the constraints along the value chain in an integrated multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary manner in ECA. The Cassava Mega Project is a collective effort by ASARECA stakeholders in the region. Within the ASARECA Secretariat, it will be jointly implemented by four programmes and one unit; Staple Crops, Agrobiodiversity and Biotechnology, Policy and Advocacy, and Uptake and Knowledgement Management, and Information and Communication Unit.

 

Project Funding Type

Non-CGS

Participating Countries

Burundi, D.R. Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and Madagascar.  

Participating  institutions and country locations

NARO-NaCRRI, Uganda; INERA, DR. Congo; KARI-Katumani,KARI-kakamega, KARI-Mutwapa, Kenya; ISAR-Rwanda; ISABU-Burundi; DRD-Naliendele, Mutwara, Tanzania; DRD-Ukiruguru, Tanzania, DRD-Kizimbani, Zanzibar; FOFIFA, Madagascar; IITA, Tanzania, and IITA-BeCA, Kenya

Lead Institution

 

Project Duration

37 Months

Starting Date

 July 2008

Ending Date

August 2011

Source of funding

Partly by USAID, EU (Trust Fund), US$ 4,955,000

Amount of funding

US$ 4,955,000.00

Available

US$ 1,042,847.00 (Includes 642,303 for CBSD and CMD; and 400,544 for tissue culture)

Shortfall

US$ 3,912,153

integrated striga management for improved sorghum productivity in east and central africa

Project code

P008-09-P1-08-008

 

Old Project Code

SC/ISMISP/09/08

Goal

Increased economic growth and improved livelihoods in the ECA while enhancing the quality of the environment

Purpose

To increase sorghum productivity by reducing crop losses caused by Striga and create market opportunities to benefit resource poor men and women farmers in participating countries

 

Background/Rationale

 

Striga, a devastating parasitic weed affects subsistence farmers in highly degraded, drought prone areas where sorghum is often the only alternative crop. Crop losses exceed 40% in most of these areas. Substantial research output is available in the NARES that could be promoted regionally. This project envisages bringing experts together to identify evaluate and promote integrated Striga management technologies.

 

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream B

Participating Countries

Tanzania, Ethiopia, Sudan and Uganda

Participating  institutions and country locations

DRT, Ministry of Agriculture (Tanzania), EIAR (Ethiopia), ARC (Sudan), NARO (Uganda)

Lead Institution

Uyole Agricultural Research Institute, Tanzania

Project Duration

26 Months

Starting Date

October 2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 143,868.84

Available

US$ 143,868.84

Shortfall

-

integrating pearl millet production practices with sustainable natural resource management for improved food security in drought stressed environments

Project code

P009-09-P1-09-009

Old Project Code

SC/IPMV/09/09

Goal

Increased economic growth and improved livelihoods in the ECA while enhancing the quality of the environment

Purpose

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the regional pearl millet system

 

Background/Rationale

 

Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum(L.) R.Br.) is the fourth most popular rain-fed cereal crop grown by over 10m resource poor small scale farmers after maize, sorghum and finger millet in ECA region. The performance of these crops declines with decrease in rainfall and soil fertility giving way to pear millet as the dominant source of energy for communities in areas receiving below 500mm of rainfall per season. Introduction of genetically superior pearl millet varieties and integrated production practices under environmentally friendly application can revolutionalise food availability and supply in these frequently food deficit regions at the same time safeguarding environment for future generations

 

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream B

Participating Countries

Kenya, Sudan, Eritrea, Tanzania

Participating  institutions and country locations

KARI (Kenya), DRT, Ministry of Agriculture (Tanzania), ARC (Sudan), NARI (Eritrea), ICRISAT

Lead Institution

Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI)

Project Duration

26 Months

Starting Date

October 2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 86,091.00

Available

US$ 86,091.00

Shortfall

-

increasing sorghum utilization and marketability through food product diversification

Project code

P010-09-P1-10-010

 

Old Project Code

SC/ISUMFPD/09/10

Goal

Increased economic growth and improved livelihoods in the ECA while enhancing the quality of the environment.

Purpose

Value-added sorghum food products developed and promoted for increased utilisation and marketing.

 

Background/Rationale

 

Sorghum, Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench, is the Africa's second most important cereal. The largest group of sorghum producers are small-scale poor-resource farmers with a poor market due to limited utilisation of the crop. Only about 3% of the Sub-Saharan Africa's sorghum is commercially processed. The only way to increase utilisation and hence marketing is by diversifying sorghum products through value-adding processing to give the convenience and quality desired by modern consumers. With the identification of the right sorghum varieties and high quality food products, the livelihoods of the population of ECA will be improved.

 

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream B

Participating Countries

Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda

Participating  institutions and country locations

DRD, Ministry of Agriculture (Tanzania),: Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute (Kenya), NARO (Uganda)

Lead Institution

Ilonga Agricultural Research Institute, Tanzania

Project Duration

20 Months

Starting Date

October 2009

Ending Date

June 2011

Source of funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 110,000.00

Available

US$ 110,000.00

Shortfall

-

livelihood improvement through integrated management practices for rain-fed lowland rice

Project code
Old Project Code.

P011-P1-11-011
09-P1-11-011

Goal

Enhanced productivity, value addition and competitiveness of the regional rice system in ECA Sub-region

Purpose

Enhance utilization of technologies for sustainable rain-fed lowland rice system

Background/Rationale
The problem of weed infestation in rainfed rice is a result of poor land preparation, low plant population, late weeding and lack of water management under flooding conditions. Therefore special attention must be directed to relieve women and children from drudgeries of weeding operation so that they can take part in other economic and social welfare activities while children concentrate in their studies at school.

The project aims at using improved varieties with Rice Yellow mottle Virus (RYMV) resistance. Improve soil fertility, improving water use by harvesting rainwater and use of bunds to enhance water management. Integrated weed management measures like improved land preparation, water management, row planting, draught animal implements for weeding and modest herbicide use will be used to reduce workload on women and children. The project will therefore identify and validate integrated crop management technologies that will ensure sustainable rice productivity for improved food security and household income while maintaining the limited environmental resource base. In the course of the process the project will have a capacity building package where farmers, extension staff, NGOs and CBOs working in the project will be targeted. The capacity building will involve training that have a direct impact in the improvement of livelihood of the rainfed lowland rice farmers. In this project the technology testing and transfer efforts will be complimented by the active participation of farmers organized in farmers� field schools, farmer research groups, and awareness raising functions, which include assortment of publications (pamphlets, brochures and posters) in local language and through various media outlets (news papers, radio and TV), also field days and exchange visits will add value to these efforts.

Project nature

Funding Stream B

Participating countries and institutions

Uyole Agricultural Research Institute and Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute � Tanzania

Lead institution

Mikocheni agricultural Research Institute

Duration

20 months

Starting date

October 2009

Ending date

June 2011

Source and amount of funding

MDTF: US$90,410

Available

US$ 90,410

Shortfall

-

up-scaling of soil/water management technologies for increased maize productivity in eca countries

Project code

P013-09-P1-13-013

Old Project Code

SC/USWMT/13

Goal

Increased Productivity, value added and competitiveness of the maize based cropping systems

Purpose

Sustainable utilisation of natural resources and maize productivity and profitability through scaling up of proven soil and water management strategies with stress tolerant cultivars enhanced.

Background/Rationale

Low maize productivity in most of the ECA countries is associated with poor management of soil moisture and organic matter. Among the technologies tested are improved stress tolerant germplasm and SWM practices. This project aims at adapting and promoting the already tested technologies to optimise maize productivity in the region. This project seeks to integrate drought tolerant maize varieties with proven soil/water management (SWM) technologies for improved maize productivity and yield stability in drought prone agro-ecologies of the ECA countries. Firstly, the project will identify issues and constraints to adoption through meeting/discussion with farmers and other stakeholders. Knowledge of existing technologies to different stakeholders will be improved through extensive training, demonstrations, field days and leaflets/brochures, in each member country. Two improved maize varieties with two SWM practices will be verified and promoted through demonstrations and the best bet combination will be scaled up through the same dissemination techniques.

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream B

Participating countries

Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya

Participating Institutions and country Location

EIAR (Ethiopia), DRD-SARI (Tanzania), KARI (Kenya

Lead Institution

DRD-SARI-Tazania

Project Duration

20 Months

Starting Date

October 2009

Ending date

June 2011

Source
of funding

MDTF

Amount of Funding

US$ 100,000

Available

US$ 100,000

development and dissemination of normal and nutritionally enhanced highland maize varieties

Project code

P016-09-P1-016

Old Project Code

SC/NNEHMV/16

Goal

Enhanced Sustainable Productivity, value added and Competitiveness of Highland maize in ECA

Purpose

Enhanced Utilization of Technologies and Inovations for Sustainable Productivity of highland Maize in ECA

Background/Rationale

Maize is cultivated in all major agro-ecological zones in the region up to the altitudes of 2400 m.a.s.l. A highland zone of the region is among the favourable maize-growing environments as it ranks second in maize production. It is generally characterised by high rainfall, cool seasonal temperatures, high human population density and consequently high levels of poverty. Despite these potentials, maize production in the highland areas is characterised by low yields due to unimproved varieties and long absence of infusion of new germplasm. Biotic stresses such as turcicum leaf blight, rust, grey leaf spot; stalk lodging and stalk borers are the major constraints. The abiotic stresses in the highland zone are frost, hail and water logging (on vertisols). Undulating terrain, low soil fertility and wide variations in climatic and other environmental conditions compounds these problems.

Although maize is an important stable food for many communities in the region, maize protein is deficient in two essential amino acids, lysine and tryptophan. Quality protein maize (QPM), however, contains nearly twice the quantity of lysine and tryptophan, which are essential building blocks of protein in humans and mono-gastric animals like poultry and pigs. QPM cultivars contain 70-100% more lysine and tryptophan than most conventional maize varieties; hence, the nutritional quality of QPM protein approaches that of the protein contained in cow's milk. QPM offers an additional potential benefit by indirectly increasing available protein for farm families that raise livestock as it increases weight gain of animals like poultry and swine. Hence, utilisation of QPM in the highlands of ECA region in general will alleviate the malnutrition problem and leads to healthier population, increased productivity and higher incomes for better livelihoods. This project, therefore, aims at developing and releasing improved normal and QPM varieties giving higher yields, with resistance to common foliar diseases and at the same time adapted to the highland ecology.

Project Funding Type

CGS Funding Stream B

Participating Countries

Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi, Rwanda.

Participating countries and institutions

NARO (Uganda), SARI (Tanzania) EARO (now called EIAR), Alemaya University (Ethiopia), ISABU (Burundi), KARI (Kenya), ISAR (Rwanda), CIMMYT

Lead Institution

EIAR- Ethiopia

Project Duration

25 Months

Starting Date

November 2009

Ending Date

December 2011

Source of Funding

MDTF

Amount of funding

US$ 66,292

Available

US$ 66,292

Shortfall

-

integrated management of cassava brown streak disease(cbsd) and cassava mosaic disease(cmd) for enhanced productivity and utilisation of cassava in eca

Project code

P017-09-P1-17-017

Old Project Code


Goal

Enhanced sustainable productivity, value added and competitiveness of the
cassava sub-sector in ECA

Purpose

Enhanced utilisation of technologies and innovations for sustainable productivity of cassava in ECA

Background/Rationale

Cassava is a major staple crop for more than 200 million people in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA). It is the second most important staple crop in Africa after maize. The crop has been prioritized by NEPAD as a "poverty fighter" that will spur industrial development in Africa. It has also been identified by COMESA as one of the strategic crops to be addressed under CAADP pillars 2 (improving infrastructure and trade related capacities for market access) and 3 (increasing food supply and reducing hunger). The ASARECA strategy (2007 - 2016) points to the fact that the biggest impact on poverty reduction will come from concentrating on staple crops with cassava ranking highest among the staples with a growing market.

Production and utilisation of cassava is constrained by a number of factors. The most critical among these are lack of novel technologies to improve productivity and lack of frameworks to enhance marketing and improvement of value chains and endemic diseases (especially viral) and pests. A pandemic of cassava mosaic disease (CMD) has been devastating cassava production in ECA over the last decade. Over the last few years, cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) has been spreading fast over the region exacerbating the risk in the entire region already adversely affected by CMD.

The Project on Integrated Management of cassava Brown Streak is being implemented within the Framework of the Cassava Mega Project. It focuses on the two diseases (CBSD and CMD). The Cassava Mega Project is an ASARECA initiative to address the constraints along the value chain in an integrated multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary manner in ECA. The Cassava Mega Project is a collective effort by ASARECA stakeholders in the region. Within the ASARECA Secretariat, it will be jointly implemented by four programmes and one unit. The Programmes are - Staple Crops, Agrobiodiversity and Biotechnology, Policy and Advocacy and Technology Uptake and Upscaling. Information and Communication unit will be involved.

Project Funding Type

Non CGS- Direct

Participating countries

Burundi, DR Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and Madagascar.

Participating Institutions and Country Locations

NARO-NaCRRI, Uganda; INERA, DR. Congo; KARI-Katumani,KARI-kakamega, KARI-Mutwapa, Kenya; ISAR-Rwanda; ISABU-Burundi; DRD-Naliendele, Mutwara, Tanzania; DRD-Ukiruguru, Tanzania, DRD-Kizimbani, Zanzibar; FOFIFA, Madagascar; IITA, Tanzania, and IITA-BeCA, Kenya

Project Duration

5 years

Starting Date

July 2008

Ending Date

December 2013

Source and amount of funding

USAID, MDTF: US$ 1,082,000  (part of the total budget of the entire mega project)

Available

US$ 642,303

shortfall

US$ 440,503

eastern africa agricultural productivity program (eaapp)

Background/Rationale

 

The Eastern Africa Agricultural Productivity Program (EAAPP) is a new initiative which offers opportunity for a subset of ASARECA countries (Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia and Uganda) to use their own resources to deepen investment in regional priorities beyond the levels achievable under ASARECA's current MDTF budget. The EAAPP objective is to strengthen and scale up regional cooperation in generation of technology, training, and dissemination programs for four regional priority commodities; dairy, rice wheat and cassava. For each of these commodities, EAAPP is supporting efforts to scale up and develop national research programs into regional centers of excellence (RCoEs). The dairy RCoE is based in Kenya, the rice RCoE in Tanzania, the wheat RCoE in Ethiopia and the cassava RCoE in Uganda. The program is supporting each of these RCoEs in taking a leading role in technology generation, dissemination, and training on a regional basis.

 

 

The RCoEs are expected to provide leadership in the region and beyond in developing innovations and forging partnerships with relevant institutions such as private businesses, Community Based Organizations, Non Governmental Organisations, Government entities and universities, that would enhance development of the cassava, rice, wheat and dairy subsectors and contribute to increased food security and economic growth. EAAPP activities focus on four main areas: (i) improving skills, facilities, and equipment in the RCoEs; (ii) agricultural research and training, including for service providers and lead farmers; (iii) greater availability of seeds and breeds; and (iv) coordination (national and regional), M&E, policy analysis, and advocacy as needed. The program is being is being financed through facilities arranged by each of the four countries, with the International Development Association (IDA) of the World Bank.

 

 

EAAPP Implementation and the roles of ASARECA 

 

 

EAAPP is fully complimentary to ASARECA's MDTF supported Operational Plan and each of the participating countries has signed a subsidiary agreement with ASARECA, allocating resources for the following roles to be undertaken by ASARECA:

 

 

1.       Convening role: Under this role, ASARECA will facilitate regional strategic meetings involving the four target countries to develop regional operational frameworks for establishment of RCoEs.   In addition, ASARECA will assist the RCoEs to develop principles and generic guidelines and standards for call of regional proposals, review and approval of the regional project proposals.

 

 

2.       Networking role: ASARECA's networking role involves facilitating information sharing platforms to enable sharing of benefits and spill over of technologies and innovations developed by individual RCoEs to other participating countries

 

 

3.       Technical backstopping role: ASARECA will backstop out-scaling of technologies, innovations and best practices across the four countries. This will be done through developing an inventory of proven technologies and best practices. In addition ASARECA will support the RCoEs to package/re-package and make available information about the proven technologies and best practices to the other countries

 

 

4.       Role in monitoring and evaluation

The key activities under this role will include supporting the RCoEs in development of a Performance Monitoring Plan (PMP) and ensuring that these are linked to ASARECA's performance framework and are FAAP complaint. ASARECA will also provide technical backstopping in M&E and managing for impact during EAAPP implementation.

 

 

5.       Policy harmonisation and advocacy: This role involves facilitation of the rationalization and harmonization of policies, procedures and regulations aimed at common standards in the participating countries. ASARECA through its Policy Analysis and Advocacy Programme (PAAP) will identify non- tariff barriers to the movement of seed and other agricultural products across national borders and facilitate a process by which the concerned countries will discuss and eventually harmonize the policies.

 

 

6.       Capacity building role: ASARECA will organise and facilitate regional training workshops in leadership and management for managers of RCoEs to equip them with the tools and skills that will make them more effective research managers, thereby enhancing the potential for the RCoEs to deliver the expected outputs. ASARECA will identify appropriate management literature for use in management training to be procured by the RCoEs and for distribution to the trainee managers for their continued learning.

 

 

7.       Training role: The RCoEs will be supported to packaging and re-packaging information on available technologies, innovations and/or best practices based on end users of the information packages.

 

 

8.       Management and Coordination: This refers to the operations of the EAAPP management mechanisms. ASARECA will report and account for the EAAPP resources it manages.

 

 

 

Project Funding Type

Governments of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Ethiopia, with IDA/World Bank

 

Participating Countries

Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Ethiopia

 

Participating  institutions and country locations

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Ministry of Agriculture Ethiopia, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI); Ministry of Agriculture Kenya, Ministry of Livestock Development Kenya, Ministry of Agriculture Food Security and Cooperatives Tanzania, National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO) Uganda, Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries Uganda.

 

Lead Institutions

 

NARO, KARI, EIAR, and Directorate of Research and Development Tanzania

 

Project Duration

 

6 Years

 

Starting Date

 

June 2009

 

Ending Date

 

February 2015

 

Source of funding

 

Governments of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Ethiopia, with IDA/World Bank

 

Amount of funding

 

US$ 120 Million (US $ 1,970,917 to ASARECA for regional coordination activities)

universities business and research in agricultural innovation (unibrain)

Background/Rationale

 

The DANIDA funded Universities Businesses and Research in Agricultural Innovations (UniBRAIN) initiative aims at forming multi institutional consortia to establish, manage and operate Agricultural Innovation Incubators which will support the commercialization of technical innovations and increased productivity of the agricultural sector in Africa. Similar to SCARDA, UniBRAIN is also coordinated by FARA at continental level. Other key partners involved in implementation of the initiative are the African Network for Agriculture, Agro forestry and Natural Resources Education (ANAFE); The African Technology Policy Studies network (ATPS); and the Pan African Agribusiness Consortium (PanAAC). UniBRAIN will strengthen African agricultural innovation systems that are expected to deliver the new and improved technologies required to improve agricultural productivity to meet the goal of CAADP as expressed in national compacts and agricultural sector development strategies. The immediate objectives of UniBRAIN are:

 

 

A.      Agricultural business innovations developed in a conducive institutional setting linking universities, research institutions and private sector

B.       Agribusiness entrepreneurs and innovators produced by improving BSc andMSc agribusiness teaching and training

C.      Innovation outputs, experiences and practices shared and up-scaled through improved networking and channels of communication.

 

 

ASARECA will be involved in implementation of activity lines A and C.

 

 

Project Funding Type

 

Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA)

 

Participating Countries

 

Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania

 

Participating  institutions and country locations

 

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI); National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO) Uganda,  alongside Universties and Business entities. Specific institutions will be determined at the end of the start-up phase which ends in December 2011

 

Lead Institution

 

To be determined

 

Project Duration

 

5 Years

 

Starting Date

 

January 2010

 

Ending Date

 

December 2014

 

Source of funding

 

DANIDA

 

Amount of funding

 

US$ 108,615 for ASARECA implemented activities

Activities

No activities in:Tanzania

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